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    Random advice for young competitors.

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    Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Guest on Sun Nov 24, 2013 12:45 pm

    Any advice for young competitors looking to compete in high level judo competitions. Anything is good.
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    BillC

    Posts : 806
    Join date : 2012-12-28
    Location : Vista, California

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by BillC on Sun Nov 24, 2013 12:50 pm

    Never miss practice.


    _________________
    Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet,
    Till Earth and Sky stand presently at God's great Judgment Seat;
    But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth,
    When two strong men stand face to face, though they come from the ends of the earth!

    - Kipling
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    Stacey

    Posts : 546
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    Location : your worst nightmares

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Stacey on Sun Nov 24, 2013 3:11 pm

    BillC wrote:Never miss practice.
    ++

    Emanuele2

    Posts : 141
    Join date : 2013-01-21

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Emanuele2 on Mon Nov 25, 2013 8:38 am

    Don't attempt a technique never tried in uchi komi.

    jkw

    Posts : 130
    Join date : 2013-01-04

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by jkw on Mon Nov 25, 2013 9:07 am

    3knvw wrote:Any advice for young competitors looking to compete in high level judo  competitions. Anything is good.
    Each NGB will have a specific pathway for development from junior level through to competing at world and Olympic levels.

    It is worth studying that pathway and dovetailing your own goals and plans with that pathway, in conjunction with your coach. You will need a strategy for how to get from your current level to the point where you are considered for membership within high-performance squads etc...

    In parallel, you should consider the political context of your NGB which - sad to say - is often not 100% meritocratic. It may be necessary to align yourself, or distance yourself from certain clubs/teams/fiefdoms. While this is understandably unpalatable, it is also realistic and you should avoid as much as possible ending in a situation where a lesser player is given an opportunity at your expense because of favouritism.

    Another point to consider is that unless you are privately funded, you will need to secure access to funding streams in order to support your training and competition regime (including, of course, medical costs), and if you come from a smaller judo nation, how to get access and funding for training programs in more significant judo centers, such as France, Germany, Japan and so on.

    Lastly, it is worth taking a cold, hard look at your realistic chances of competing at this level. For example, if you are starting judo in your late teens, it is highly unlikely that you will be able to develop the requisite components and skill set before you are simply too old. Perhaps try to attend an elite training session as an observer to get a sense of the disparity in skill, fitness etc... that exists between a strong 'recreational' judo player and international competitors. Also, if you come from a country where judo is a minority sport (most English-speaking countries), a 'career' in international competitive judo could be a difficult, costly road - but - as with many difficult things in life, one with many surprising rewards.

    Nevertheless, good luck!
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    Steve Leadbeater

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    Location : Sydney Australia

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Steve Leadbeater on Mon Nov 25, 2013 9:12 am

    Go, Do, Enjoy yourself and learn, and if you win a medal, that's a bonus !!

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    Guest

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Guest on Mon Nov 25, 2013 11:56 am

    Thanks for all the replies!
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    BillC

    Posts : 806
    Join date : 2012-12-28
    Location : Vista, California

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by BillC on Mon Nov 25, 2013 3:24 pm

    Steve Leadbeater wrote:Go, Do, Enjoy yourself and learn, and if you win a medal, that's a bonus !!
    I don't want to put words in Steve's mouth, but I will build on his comments.

    It's often said "I'd rather be lucky than good ... but it seems the harder I work the luckier I get."  Thus my original comment.

    More than that ... sorry to say that the shortest path to the medal stand is often morally questionable, as are the goals and means employed by those who promote "high level judo."  International competition is ultimately a frustration for all but the very few, very lucky individuals ... a fleeting illusion anyway ...  Yamashita Yasuhiro famously said the day after he won the Olympic gold something to the effect of "I was the gold medalist yesterday, but not today.  If the competition were held today, someone else likely would have won."  In other words "sometimes you eat the bear, sometimes the bear eats you."  It's the perseverance that is important in and of itself.

    What the old farts are telling you is that based on our experience you will be a better ... perhaps even a happier and more complete judoka ... and human being if you concentrate on discovering what judo really is, the joy of being a judoka, become a person whose grace and gentleness amplify their obvious personal strength.  And if you are the type of person to whom success in competition comes ... as Steve says ... "that's a bonus."


    _________________
    Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet,
    Till Earth and Sky stand presently at God's great Judgment Seat;
    But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth,
    When two strong men stand face to face, though they come from the ends of the earth!

    - Kipling
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    Ricebale

    Posts : 423
    Join date : 2013-01-01
    Location : Wollongong Australia

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Ricebale on Mon Nov 25, 2013 11:51 pm

    I had some kids on their first comp over the weekend.

    Before they went I told them to bow politely, listen to the refreee at all times, use a throw to put their opponents on their back and hold hold them there and most of all to enjoy the experience.

    They all had a ball.

    Cheers
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    Jihef

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    Location : Brussels, Belgium

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Jihef on Tue Nov 26, 2013 1:33 am

    3knvw wrote:Any advice for young competitors looking to compete in high level judo  competitions. Anything is good.
    Here is some food for thought :
    SETTING TRAINING GOALS FOR JUDO
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    NittyRanks

    Posts : 99
    Join date : 2013-05-10
    Location : New York State

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by NittyRanks on Tue Nov 26, 2013 7:24 am

    Nice advice here.
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    Ben Reinhardt

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    Location : Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Ben Reinhardt on Tue Nov 26, 2013 7:48 am

    Emanuele2 wrote:Don't attempt a technique never tried in uchi komi.
    Don't attempt a technique only ever attempted in Uchi Komi, either.

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    Ben Reinhardt

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    Join date : 2012-12-28
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    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Ben Reinhardt on Tue Nov 26, 2013 7:51 am

    jkw wrote:
    3knvw wrote:Any advice for young competitors looking to compete in high level judo  competitions. Anything is good.
    Each NGB will have a specific pathway for development from junior level through to competing at world and Olympic levels.

    It is worth studying that pathway and dovetailing your own goals and plans with that pathway, in conjunction with your coach. You will need a strategy for how to get from your current level to the point where you are considered for membership within high-performance squads etc...

    In parallel, you should consider the political context of your NGB which - sad to say - is often not 100% meritocratic. It may be necessary to align yourself, or distance yourself from certain clubs/teams/fiefdoms. While this is understandably unpalatable, it is also realistic and you should avoid as much as possible ending in a situation where a lesser player is given an opportunity at your expense because of favouritism.

    Another point to consider is that unless you are privately funded, you will need to secure access to funding streams in order to support your training and competition regime (including, of course, medical costs), and if you come from a smaller judo nation, how to get access and funding for training programs in more significant judo centers, such as France, Germany, Japan and so on.

    Lastly, it is worth taking a cold, hard look at your realistic chances of competing at this level. For example, if you are starting judo in your late teens, it is highly unlikely that you will be able to develop the requisite components and skill set before you are simply too old. Perhaps try to attend an elite training session as an observer to get a sense of the disparity in skill, fitness etc... that exists between a strong 'recreational' judo player and international competitors. Also, if you come from a country where judo is a minority sport (most English-speaking countries), a 'career' in international competitive judo could be a difficult, costly road - but - as with many difficult things in life, one with many surprising rewards.

    Nevertheless, good luck!
    Darned good advice !

    I would add that a young person should evaluate there physical/medical condition as well. Starting out with some sort of injury, even minor but not really fixable, can be a huge drag on your training (depending on the injury).

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    Ben Reinhardt

    Posts : 790
    Join date : 2012-12-28
    Location : Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Ben Reinhardt on Tue Nov 26, 2013 7:52 am

    3knvw wrote:Any advice for young competitors looking to compete in high level judo  competitions. Anything is good.
    How about telling us about yourself. How old you are, how long/much you have trained at Judo, stuff like that.

    Guest
    Guest

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by Guest on Tue Nov 26, 2013 12:14 pm

    I am a thirteen year old green belt i have been training since i was nine i do judo 5 days a week plus
    weight training three days a week and i go hiking every weekend.It is my goal to go to the olympics and other IJF events.
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    contrarian

    Posts : 63
    Join date : 2013-04-28

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by contrarian on Wed Nov 27, 2013 1:18 am

    have fun doing it and love what you do.
    i've known people who were fantastic competitors, but did not like judo. they were forced to train and never developed a love for judo. it's a sad sight for me, because i thought i had the love, but none of their talent. but life is funny like that.

    samsmith2424

    Posts : 94
    Join date : 2013-01-03

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by samsmith2424 on Wed Nov 27, 2013 2:36 am

    You would have told Dave Starrbrook not to start judo at 19!!



    jkw wrote:
    3knvw wrote:Any advice for young competitors looking to compete in high level judo  competitions. Anything is good.
    Each NGB will have a specific pathway for development from junior level through to competing at world and Olympic levels.

    It is worth studying that pathway and dovetailing your own goals and plans with that pathway, in conjunction with your coach. You will need a strategy for how to get from your current level to the point where you are considered for membership within high-performance squads etc...

    In parallel, you should consider the political context of your NGB which - sad to say - is often not 100% meritocratic. It may be necessary to align yourself, or distance yourself from certain clubs/teams/fiefdoms. While this is understandably unpalatable, it is also realistic and you should avoid as much as possible ending in a situation where a lesser player is given an opportunity at your expense because of favouritism.

    Another point to consider is that unless you are privately funded, you will need to secure access to funding streams in order to support your training and competition regime (including, of course, medical costs), and if you come from a smaller judo nation, how to get access and funding for training programs in more significant judo centers, such as France, Germany, Japan and so on.

    Lastly, it is worth taking a cold, hard look at your realistic chances of competing at this level. For example, if you are starting judo in your late teens, it is highly unlikely that you will be able to develop the requisite components and skill set before you are simply too old. Perhaps try to attend an elite training session as an observer to get a sense of the disparity in skill, fitness etc... that exists between a strong 'recreational' judo player and international competitors. Also, if you come from a country where judo is a minority sport (most English-speaking countries), a 'career' in international competitive judo could be a difficult, costly road - but - as with many difficult things in life, one with many surprising rewards.

    Nevertheless, good luck!

    jkw

    Posts : 130
    Join date : 2013-01-04

    Re: Random advice for young competitors.

    Post by jkw on Wed Nov 27, 2013 2:48 am

    samsmith2424 wrote:You would have told Dave Starrbrook not to start judo at 19!!

    It's always possible to provide a contrary example, but this doesn't negate the argument as we are speaking in generalities. For example if to OP was already an Olympic athlete in another fighting sport then this would clearly change things much.

    I certainly would never tell anybody not to start judo - what I said was it is worth examining your chances of becoming an elite level competitor in judo if you are in your late teens against the costs/effort required and likelihood of success.

    I would offer this advice to anyone who is contemplating any major change that I know will require enormous sacrifice, resources and effort. Not only for yourself but also those close to you. It is never a bad thing to carefully count the costs before embarking on a big endeavor.

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