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    Stiff arms!

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    Fritz

    Posts : 102
    Join date : 2013-01-16

    Re: Stiff arms!

    Post by Fritz on Sat Aug 09, 2014 7:06 am

    Ben Reinhardt wrote:Ude Garami might or might not be a "throw" for scoring purposes under current judo rules (or older one's either). We've had some extensive discusions of that topic here or at the old judo forum.
    May be you mean "Ude-Gaeshi" (resp. Yoko-Wakare) as shown in the video?


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    Ben Reinhardt

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    Join date : 2012-12-28
    Location : Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

    Re: Stiff arms!

    Post by Ben Reinhardt on Sat Aug 09, 2014 8:18 am

    Fritz wrote:
    Ben Reinhardt wrote:Ude Garami might or might not be a "throw" for scoring purposes under current judo rules (or older one's either). We've had some extensive discusions of that topic here or at the old judo forum.
    May be you mean "Ude-Gaeshi" (resp. Yoko-Wakare) as shown in the video?

    Yes, thanks for pointing out my mistake. No, wait, flying or jumping entry to Ude Garami is the obvious answer to stiff arms ! Brilliant !



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    Mifunes_Son

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    Join date : 2015-04-25

    Re: Stiff arms!

    Post by Mifunes_Son on Sun Apr 26, 2015 4:44 am

    sydvicious wrote:One of the most important things I've been working on is to stop doing it and, so far, I'm happy with my progress. I'm getting much 'looser' in randori. But last night, during randori, I was partnered with a fellow 4th Kyu and he was stiff arming like crazy!
    So my question to the elders is simple. What do you do when you are up against someone like that. Are there certain techniques that work better in that situation or ways to get round the stiff arming in order to close the distance, etc?

    The best strategy to use when facing someone who stiff arms any attempt by you to do anything is to simply wait them out. Take it as a chance to work on avoiding your partners throws with proper body movements, not directly resisting them. The problem your having is that you want to dictate what happens and when and your opponent is trying to do the exact same thing. To use a metaphor, its the equivalent of the two of you having a conversation and screaming at each other the whole time. Instead you should accept your opponents movements (listen) and wait for your turn to counter (talk). The real opportunity that your missing is in capitalizing on your opponents mistakes and counter-throwing him. Take a negative view of randori; what this means is that instead of trying to make things happen to your opponent (positive) focus instead on avoiding mistakes and capitalizing on your opponents.

    Ben Reinhardt

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    Location : Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

    Re: Stiff arms!

    Post by Ben Reinhardt on Wed Apr 29, 2015 4:12 am

    judoratt wrote:
    Ben Reinhardt wrote:I did some randori with the late Paul Maruyama back in the early/mid '80s at the USOTC. He had the whole paralyze you to the ground thing down pat,LOL ! Plus very nice technique of course...he was around 50 years old at the time, I think, and was still running the Pike's Peak "Marathon". His comment to me was along the lines of that had good fighting spirit but I needed to learn to stand up...which was impossible as he had some sort of neutronium in his body. Of course, he destroyed all the national level lightweights in randori, and not a few of the larger guys too...

    I suspect Paul will be quite surprised to learn that he is dead.

    I edited my post to reflect the correction, thanks very much for pointing it out !

    Then I am sure I am confusing him with someone else who is dead. My apologies to him if he happens to read this !

    I did do randori with him, though, and he sure as heck was alive then. Watching him do randori with Tommy Martin was quite the experience.[/quote]



    Didn't Paul fight at the US open and medal after he was 50. Every one said he was a monster and enjoyed running pikes peak. Heck I had trouble driving up Pikes peak. Joe Marchell said paul would run it with the OTC team and smoke every one. [/quote]

    He did indeed run Pikes Peak. My original sensei trained at the OTC when he was the coach their. He had plenty of stories about Paul running, LOL ! There were only a couple of guys who could keep up with him. They had another steep run they used to do, can't remember what it was. May have been at the Air Force Academy.


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    NittyRanks

    Posts : 95
    Join date : 2013-05-10
    Location : New York State

    Re: Stiff arms!

    Post by NittyRanks on Fri May 08, 2015 12:51 am

    Ben Reinhardt wrote:
    Cichorei Kano wrote:
    tafftaz wrote:
    Ben Reinhardt wrote:
    . How about the feeling that you have been glued to the floor when coming to grips, eh ? Guy grabs you, and it's like instant paralysis. He still moves around but it's like wearing cement zori, trying to do anything other than follow.



    Been there a few times , in randori and shiai. You are spot on about instant paralysis Ben. Especially when gripped by a world class judoka. A real shock to the system.

    Decades later it is now fun to look back at, but it wasn't fun at the time. What also is 'fun' is how people who have not been there and who watch judo videos see these moves happen and think it is all just technique and no force. They don't realize that even if you don't do a thing yourself you're soaked in sweat after 30 seconds just trying to remain on your feet. When they make a foot sweet it isn't even a footsweep, but it is like they unleash this hugely powerful and explosive "low kick" on your leg. But there is psychology involved too. If your opponent is physically really stronger than you it is important to hide it, if you can, because an opponent realizing he is stronger is at an advantage. It's a tricky thing because if he is really stronger and you have to cover up that you are weaker that means you have to put a lot of energy into withstanding his strength. The best strategy in that is to attack yourself, but that is of course yet another challenge when you are already putting in so much just trying to remain on your feet and withstand his strength. And don't forget, always be weary of the guys with the hairy forearms, those are the once to be careful for !!   pirat 

    I did some randori with the Paul Maruyama back in the early/mid '80s at the USOTC. He had the whole paralyze you to the ground thing down pat,LOL ! Plus very nice technique of course...he was around 50 years old at the time, I think, and was still running the Pike's Peak "Marathon". His comment to me was along the lines of that had good fighting spirit but I needed to learn to stand up...which was impossible as he had some sort of neutronium in his body. Of course, he destroyed all the national level lightweights in randori, and not a few of the larger guys too...

    I think there is a lot of psychology of competing that does  not get covered anymore. Like  not acting tired even if you feel like your lungs may show up on the tatami at any moment. I was never allowed to lay on the tatami after being thrown, bend over and breath hard, or show any signs of being exhausted, other than unconsciousness or vomiting, and the vomit had better have gone inside the jacket not on the floor.

    "Get up!" was a common motivator, and knowing that if I didn't, I was going to get thrown when I did, or, just picked up off the tatami and thrown again, with increasing force and body contact until I managed to motivate.

    Like this post. "Get up!" is a motivator where we train. Instructor tells us that if you can get up your body will catch up.

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