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    Going for Shodan

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    Quest50

    Posts : 13
    Join date : 2014-05-11

    Going for Shodan

    Post by Quest50 on Wed Jun 18, 2014 8:14 pm

    Hi to all, Smile 
    I am a returner to Judo after an absence of 30 years having been involved in Judo as a good competitor through my teens. I am now 50, & extremely fit for my age having been an elite cyclist for most of my life, Iv been (re)training now for just a month.
    Having been assessed  by my club coach I have retained my old grade of 3rd Kyu. Green. I wasn't sure which way forward I wanted to go at first but being a competitive person,& I have made a determined decision to go for Shodan. I realise it will take a bit of time, I don't want to rush it, I do want to be worthy of the grade! but Im determined to stick with it, & will compete again after Iv improved a little more. Iv looked at the BJA website & it seems a little confusing, & I really have no idea as to the format involved in moving up the grades these days. Im just out of touch. obviously I will be seeking advice from the guys in the club & the coach, but also I would be very greatfull if anyone could give me an experienced practical insight into how to achieve my goal within the British judo grading system. obviously get to 1st kyu first! what are the gradings like? How long it will take from my current grade?  Was it a hard slog? or a breeze? is it nerve racking? any info gratefully  received thank you.

    Anatol

    Posts : 190
    Join date : 2014-01-20

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Anatol on Wed Jun 18, 2014 9:22 pm

    You are a green belt?


    "obviously" go to blue belt first ...


    ;-)

    Quest50

    Posts : 13
    Join date : 2014-05-11

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Quest50 on Wed Jun 18, 2014 11:56 pm

    Anatol wrote:You are a green belt?


    "obviously" go to blue belt first ...


    ;-)
    "Obviously" Wink  But doesn't really answer my question, I meant progress to 1st Kyu before going for Dan grade. My question is really aimed at the Dan grading system in the uk.

    tafftaz

    Posts : 330
    Join date : 2012-12-31
    Age : 52
    Location : Wales, UK

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by tafftaz on Thu Jun 19, 2014 1:05 am

    All the info you need will be on the BJA website under gradings.
    There are a few paths open for 1st kyu to Shodan.
    One is points accumulation through dan gradings and competitions (although the point scoring comps are normally of a high standard, normally 3 star and above). The other path is the technical route, where a superior knowledge of technique is required compared to what used to be the standard dan grade theory that is taken when enough points are accumulated.
    Also if anyone tells you that getting to shodan is a "breeze" then they have not been graded correctly or appropriately. Also being a good competitor at junior level will not necessarily make you one at senior level. They are 2 different animals. Your fitness will help greatly, but no amount of cycling or gym work will prepare you for judo as a senior.
    I will say though, that in my experience, anyone who asks how long will it take to get to shodan very rarely stick it out for longer than 2 months.
    I really hope that you do not turn out to be one of those types.
    Enjoy judo for what it is and the grades will fall into place soon enough.
    I did write an extensive reply but it got lost when I tried to post it.

    Where do you train in the UK if you don't mind me asking?
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    JudoStu

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    Age : 45
    Location : UK

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by JudoStu on Thu Jun 19, 2014 1:51 am

    I agree with what Tafftaz has said above. I'm an older (41) 1st kyu and recently entered my 1st dan grading competition and it hurt. 3 fights, 3 losses all by ippon. There is an obvious step up in level and intensity as everyone wants to attain that mythical black belt.

    Good luck with your training, just stick with it and the belts will come in due course.


    Quest50

    Posts : 13
    Join date : 2014-05-11

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Quest50 on Thu Jun 19, 2014 3:45 am

    tafftaz wrote:All the info you need will be on the BJA website under gradings.
    There are a few paths open for 1st kyu to Shodan.
    One is points accumulation through dan gradings and competitions (although the point scoring comps are normally of a high standard, normally 3 star and above). The other path is the technical route, where a superior knowledge of technique is required compared to what used to be the standard dan grade theory that is taken when enough points are accumulated.
    Also if anyone tells you that getting to shodan is a "breeze" then they have not been graded correctly or appropriately. Also being a good competitor at junior level will not necessarily make you one at senior level. They are 2 different animals. Your fitness will help greatly, but no amount of cycling or gym work will prepare you for judo as a senior.
    I will say though, that in my experience, anyone who asks how long will it take to get to shodan very rarely stick it out for longer than 2 months.
    I really hope that you do not turn out to be one of those types.
    Enjoy judo for what it is and the grades will fall into place soon enough.
    I did write an extensive reply but it got lost when I tried to post it.

    Where do you train in the UK if you don't mind me asking?

    Thankyou Taffaz for the great reply & your advice. Very Happy 
    I train at my old club "the legendery" Pinewood judo club, now under Mark Fricker, sadly my old sensei The great Don Werner died this year, I was trained by him to national junior level through my teens, I was taught very very well & allot of what he taught me I have retained to this day, even if my body has forgotten what it used to do automatically. Im not worried about how long it will take, & I certainly dont think it will be a piece of cake, the biggest achievments in life you have to work hard for, im no stranger to hard work. I have an advantage that my body is still young for my years, I am enjoying the judo immensely,& I have a wealth of "Don trained" experienced judoka to help me along the way, but I do want to go for it.
    The focus I think will keep the fire burning. I do also want to compete at masters competitions in the near future so maybe this is the route to take. I know what you mean about the difference between junior & senior judo, my old junior habits get me into trouble sometimes awork in progress.
    Regards. Marc. Do you mind me asking what club you train with?

    Anatol

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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Anatol on Thu Jun 19, 2014 6:55 am



    You are in good shape, so there is nothing to fear.



    .


    Last edited by Anatol on Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:21 pm; edited 1 time in total

    tafftaz

    Posts : 330
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    Age : 52
    Location : Wales, UK

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by tafftaz on Thu Jun 19, 2014 8:51 pm

    My club is Imperial Judo in Swansea, South Wales Marc. I remember Mr Werner well. Very prolific coach. I was never on speaking terms with him but over the years myself, and some of my students have competed against many of his judoka. My son has become quite an expert at the "pinewood" turnover that was used against him many years ago. He liked it and has used it many times over the years.
    Personally I believe that anyone under the age of 45, who is in good physical shape should do competitive gradings. There are many of these specifically for masters now as well.
    I have a friend who started judo in his late forties. He got to 1st kyu at age 54. He tried competitive gradings and managed to get some points. He asked me finally if he could do a technical dan grading as his age was against him in many dan gradings where he was up against guys much younger.
    He spent nearly a year in preparation for his grading and his judo technique became so much better.
    Learning nage no kata helped him immensely. The examiner was impressed with his judo and complimented him on his technique frequently throughout the grading. which took a couple of hours.

    Quest50

    Posts : 13
    Join date : 2014-05-11

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Quest50 on Thu Jun 19, 2014 9:02 pm

    Anatol wrote:The "real man" way is to go to shodan via shiai, because Judo is a Martial Art.


    Funny story:

    A Brown Belt - 10 years younger than me - , who was prepairing for his shodan had to compete in some shiai, to get via "the technical way" to shodan. Before the fight in a local competition  he came to me and said: "Don't be "too rough" ...

    You as a cyclist love real challenges, do you?

    Shiai will proof your understanding of Judo - and also your phantasies about Judo.

    You are in good shape, so there is nothing to fear.



    .
    I completely agree that shiai is the way!
    When I posted "the legendary Pinewood judo club" & "The great Don Werner" I should have divulged the fact that He was not just a teacher of judo he was t teacher in life & taught us much much more. A great work ethic in training, how to get the best out of ourselves in competition & also outside of sport, to play fair, to respect other judoka/officials/people, to accept defeat when we were beaten fair & square, & to train harder & work on our weaknesses so that we could win next time & be "better than our best". A learning I have carried with me all my life.

    My Story.... When Nicola Fairbrother (Pinewood JC) psyching herself up & jumping up & down to loosen up, on the side before the world championship final in Hamleton Canada Don put his hand on her shoulder,& said something like "You can do this lassie" "Ill do my best" she replied, "Do better than your best!, when you think you've  got nothing left in the bag, dig a little deeper there's always a little extra ". That was the man he was & she won that Gold medal. beating a Japanese fighter with ippon in the end. & I have similar memories of such conversations he had with me.

    Ok I stopped judo along time ago & i'm a little rusty,  in persuit of a different sport. of which I have also won National medals, & now I,m back on the tatami. I am no stranger to competition! If someone came up to me & said "take it easy on me" "Don't be too rough" etc the competition is won before you step onto the tatami, or clip into the peddles before that persuit race in the velodrome. such people have fear. I have never had fear, nerves, apprehension, of course, they bring the best out in you. I have a deep determination to achieve what I strive for in life & in sport & Iv got Don to thank for that. & so have all the judoka in my club, & those who have passed through his hands. Don't take my word for it look on the club website.... 4 world champions, 4 Olympians 1 Olympic silver, 822 national medals, 296 British champions, 9 European titles, 2 commonwealth,28 world medals, 3G 4S & 16B, 144 national squad members, & 132 black belts, soon to be 133! (me). & that's just Pinewood Judo club. Says it all.


    Last edited by Quest50 on Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:31 pm; edited 2 times in total

    Quest50

    Posts : 13
    Join date : 2014-05-11

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Quest50 on Thu Jun 19, 2014 9:35 pm

    tafftaz wrote:My club is Imperial Judo in Swansea, South Wales Marc.  I remember Mr Werner well. Very prolific coach. I was never on speaking terms with him but over the years myself, and some of my students have competed against many of his judoka. My son has become quite an expert at the "pinewood" turnover that was used against him many years ago. He liked it and has used it many times over the years.
    Personally I believe that anyone under the age of 45, who is in good physical shape should do competitive gradings. There are many of these specifically for masters now as well.
    I have a friend who started judo in his late forties. He got to 1st kyu at age 54. He tried competitive gradings and managed to get some points. He asked me finally if he could do a technical dan grading as his age was against him in many dan gradings where he was up against guys much younger.
    He spent nearly a year in preparation for his grading and his judo technique became so much better.
    Learning nage no kata helped him immensely. The examiner was impressed with his judo and complimented him on his technique frequently throughout the grading. which took a couple of hours.

    Thank you taffaz for your reply, He was indeed a very prolific coach,

    The "pinewood turnover" you refer to,  I know it well! Originated from the days when we were called Bracknell Judo club, we moved to a different location & renamed the club Pinewood, & so the name of the turnover changed. But it is the "Bracknell Roll" we won hundreds of fights using it. Only last night in training a guy (Green belt) turned up from a London club to train with us & during a newaza session with him, he did the fatal thing & stuck both his arms in. Thank you very much game over, old habits die hard eh! Only the inexperienced do that these days wouldn't you agree, lol.
    Thanks for your advice it is worth bearing in mind, Im going to go down the competition rout for now. Recon Ill be ok, see how it goes.
    Hey if ever I'm in Swansea, & with your clubs permission of course, may I drop in for a session & say hello?. I know you will be more than welcome at Pinewood.
    Cheers for now Marc.

    tafftaz

    Posts : 330
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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by tafftaz on Thu Jun 19, 2014 9:42 pm

    Anyone is welcome to train with us Marc. No permission needed , just come along.

    Quest50

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    Join date : 2014-05-11

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Quest50 on Thu Jun 19, 2014 10:24 pm

    Many thanks, what a great sport judo is? Glad to be back in the family!
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    Davaro

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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Davaro on Fri Jun 20, 2014 6:00 am

    Anatol wrote:The "real man" way is to go to shodan via shiai, because Judo is a Martial Art.


    Funny story:

    A Brown Belt - 10 years younger than me - , who was prepairing for his shodan had to compete in some shiai, to get via "the technical way" to shodan. Before the fight in a local competition  he came to me and said: "Don't be "too rough" ...

    You as a cyclist love real challenges, do you?

    Shiai will proof your understanding of Judo - and also your phantasies about Judo.

    You are in good shape, so there is nothing to fear.



    .

    Forgive my direct attitude to this post, but it is one of the dumbest I have seen on this forum... the insulting way you put down the "technical" way to grade making me think you are perhaps a jacket wrestler that OD's on roids, enjoying beating the crap out of "weaker" people and get off on hurting others. IE not going easy on someone you may be able to beat very easily. The club bully perhaps?

    Of course it may just be that English is not your first language and you perhaps don't have a better way of explaining what you mean. If that is the case, my most humble apologies.

    Take Tafftaz as an example. He makes (almost) the same point as you but much, much more diplomatic.

    Don't crit the "technical" way to Shodan. In my country, as an example, it is the ONLY way to get Shodan. Showing your knowledge of the entire junior kyu syllabus, Nage-no kata, etc. as WELL as shiai. You know, all the "technical" aspects that make a dan grade knowledgeable?

    As a multiple national champion and commonwealth medallist at Ikyu, I failed my Shodan technical 1st time round. I would love to just be able to beat some guys to be graded... that's the easy way in my opinion. Rant/


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    Anatol

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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Anatol on Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:59 pm



    Hi Quest 50

    So I see, you have a lot competetive spirit. That's good to hear from a 50 year old.


    Last edited by Anatol on Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:22 pm; edited 1 time in total

    Quest50

    Posts : 13
    Join date : 2014-05-11

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Quest50 on Fri Jun 20, 2014 9:43 pm

    Davaro wrote:
    Anatol wrote:The "real man" way is to go to shodan via shiai, because Judo is a Martial Art.


    Funny story:

    A Brown Belt - 10 years younger than me - , who was prepairing for his shodan had to compete in some shiai, to get via "the technical way" to shodan. Before the fight in a local competition  he came to me and said: "Don't be "too rough" ...

    You as a cyclist love real challenges, do you?

    Shiai will proof your understanding of Judo - and also your phantasies about Judo.

    You are in good shape, so there is nothing to fear.



    .

    Forgive my direct attitude to this post, but it is one of the dumbest I have seen on this forum... the insulting way you put down the "technical" way to grade making me think you are perhaps a jacket wrestler that OD's on roids, enjoying beating the crap out of "weaker" people and get off on hurting others. IE not going easy on someone you may be able to beat very easily. The club bully perhaps?

    Of course it may just be that English is not your first language and you perhaps don't have a better way of explaining what you mean. If that is the case, my most humble apologies.

    Take Tafftaz as an example. He makes (almost) the same point as you but much, much more diplomatic.

    Don't crit the "technical" way to Shodan. In my country, as an example, it is the ONLY way to get Shodan. Showing your knowledge of the entire junior kyu syllabus, Nage-no kata, etc. as WELL as shiai. You know, all the "technical" aspects that make a dan grade knowledgeable?

    As a multiple national champion and commonwealth medallist at Ikyu, I failed my Shodan technical 1st time round. I would love to just be able to beat some guys to be graded... that's the easy way in my opinion. Rant/


    As somebody returning to Judo after a long absence from the sport, I am not that conversant & out of touch with Dan gradings in the UK let alone judo organisations outside of my country, which is why I asked the question on this forum.
    Obviously judo Federations, Associations, & councils in whatever nation promote the sport for ALL to participate in, no matter what there ability, & to develop there understanding as well as (for most) the physical aspect of the sport.
    Taffaz IMO makes a good & valid point worth considering, that there is more than one way to achieve shodan, at least in the UK, he also makes a valid point that not all are physically capable of competing in shiai but can still attain shodan. What happens when you move through the Dan grades? Would you be expected to fight for 7th Dan at the age of 80? It is a personal choice, & there is no right or wrong way to go. There is a technical element whichever way!
    "Technical way" or "Shiai way" IMO Achieving the highest grading accolade in judo demands respect, I am a fit 51 & only weigh 72kg, in my club there are much older less fit high Dan grades than myself & women Dan grades that I could beat easily with strength alone. & weaker Kyu grades for that matter. Does that make me a better judoka? NO WAY. There is no place for ego's in judo. On the other end of the scale on only my first session back to Judo in 30 years wearing a borrowed (beginners) red belt a very powerful & technically brilliant 85kg 5th Dan & former Commonwealth medallist Still competing at high level threw me very hard, so hard in fact I was winded & had a head ache for a while. Was that the right thing to do? I don't class him as a bully! & I never asked him to take it easy with me, his technique was perfect I landed flat on my back, & sustained no injuries, He apologised afterwards, bought me a drink in the bar & has since given me some great coaching & advice, & we have formed a good friendship, he still throws me around, but I can usually stand up afterwards & he takes the time to explain if I have done something wrong or walked onto the throw. The important point, I have had loads of encouragement, great coaching, been complimented on my returning judo skills, even after my short return, & been told by the much more experienced I will achieve my goal. Don't get me wrong I'm not good enough yet, or have the knowledge. But in time & learning I will.

    Quest50

    Posts : 13
    Join date : 2014-05-11

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Quest50 on Fri Jun 20, 2014 10:41 pm

    Anatol wrote:Hi Davaro

    Sure it was one of the dumbest postings on this forum ever seen - looking for the answer.


    Hi Quest 50

    So I see, you have a lot competetive spirit. That's good to hear from a 50 year old. What you are learning technically, you have to proof in randori and shiai. If you strive for perfection, you have a lot of phantasies, how your Judo could be and randori and shiai are the natural and practical equalizers. In other martial arts there are a lot of phantasies, how good and how perfect they are. My observation - if you are over 40, you have no chance to go to shodan via competition points, except you are physical extrem strong or extrem talented, simply because the competition is too strong within the 15 - 35 years old. If you collect these poinst needed at the master category, yes you can, if there are a lot competitions and you should not underestimate that there are a lot of old foxes because the rabbits dont compete anymore. Technical Grading to shodan is perfect, because you learn a lot of the basics, you dont only do your tokui waza and you also have to be both sided right and left and left and right and via kata you learn more about the principles of Judo and also the beauty.

    Wish you the best progress and greetings to Pinewood Club!


    Sure I have a lot of competitive Spirit. My old Sensai Don Werner, or the new Mark Fricker would never ever, ever say to anyone "You have no chance over 40 via the competition route" Do you tell the guys at your club that? hardly inspiring! That's why we have 6 judoka all over 50 currently in the Great Britain Masters judo squad who regularly compete & win in competition here & all over the world in masters events & with the younger guys, a couple of which have also returned after a break from Judo.
    Lyn Tilley (Pinewood JC) is 60 & has won 4 world masters titles the last being in 2009 at the age of 55 though she has just recently retired from competitive judo. would she tell me Iv got no chance in competition? I realise its not easy & I certainly don't underestimate anyone.  As for phantasies as you put it, these are just pipe dreams, I don't have phantasies just drive, & a willingness to learn.

    Anatol

    Posts : 190
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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Anatol on Fri Jun 20, 2014 11:17 pm

    Hi Quest 50



    These are "Master Competitions" for the old ones with a seperation of 5 years - so a 50 years old is maybe competing with a 54 years old ...

    .


    Last edited by Anatol on Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:23 pm; edited 1 time in total

    Anatol

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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Anatol on Sat Jun 21, 2014 1:17 am




    Competetive Judo is for the young ones: endurance,vO2 max,  speed, flexibility, reaction - only maybe strength is something, where you have a chance as a 50 year old.


    Last edited by Anatol on Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:24 pm; edited 1 time in total

    tafftaz

    Posts : 330
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    Location : Wales, UK

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by tafftaz on Sat Jun 21, 2014 1:57 am

    Anatol wrote:Hi Quest 50


    But if you want to collect points via Masters, sure it is not only possible but if you have some talent easy, because Master Division is not tough - more friendly, to collect some medails in a field of 3 to 8 competitors per division.

    .



    Maybe at your local level.
    My last (major) shiai as a senior was at 38yrs old and won our national championships.
    Competed in Commonwealth masters and World masters in 40-44yrs,u90kgs and took bronze in Commonwealth and got smashed in the Worlds by a Russian who went on to win it. Nearly broke my arm.
    Second Commonwealth masters was at 45-49kgs at same weight (where I had the pleasure of meeting our very own Davaro by the way) and got no medal but 20 points toward my next dan grade.
    I have had as hard a fight in some masters shiai as I did when I was competing as a senior. Also the entries for my weight categories in the above tournaments were in excess of 30 judoka in both Commonwealths, and 40+ in the Worlds.
    Hoping to go to Worlds in Japan next.

    Anatol

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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Anatol on Sat Jun 21, 2014 3:06 am



    Quest 50

    important question:

    Would you restart Judo IF there were no ranks/belts and no medals?






    Last edited by Anatol on Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:25 pm; edited 1 time in total

    tafftaz

    Posts : 330
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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by tafftaz on Sat Jun 21, 2014 3:29 am

    Anatol wrote:Hi Tafftaz

    I don't think, Quest 50 want to go to the masters world championships directly ...

    There were 6 entries at the world championships 2013 category +100 M5 ... (Koppe wins)


    Quest 50

    Most important question:

    Would you restart Judo IF there were no ranks/belts and no medals?

    If yes - perfect
    If no - wasted time


    .

    Hi Anatol

    Yeah the heavyweights tend to have less entries (might have to put on some weight  Very Happy ).

    As for your question(which is a good one),would I restart judo?
    Yes, I would. I started judo many years ago because my dad did it, and I always wanted to be like my dad.
    The belts and medals came later but they were not, and are still not my main motivation.
    I run my own plumbing business by day and teach and train 6 sessions, over 3 days a week. No monetary gain involved.
    It might be a cliché but I still love practising judo. I enjoy teaching what I have learned, but I still love randori. Still love shiai.
    I have not been able to practise for 9 weeks due to groin surgery and the break has driven me insane. Started back this week and it feels fantastic.

    Quest50

    Posts : 13
    Join date : 2014-05-11

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Quest50 on Sat Jun 21, 2014 6:44 pm

    Anatol wrote:Hi Tafftaz

    I don't think, Quest 50 want to go to the masters world championships directly ...

    There were 6 entries at the world championships 2013 category +100 M5 ... (Koppe wins)


    Quest 50

    Most important question:

    Would you restart Judo IF there were no ranks/belts and no medals?

    If yes - perfect
    If no - wasted time


    .

    Yes a good question!

    Obviously I wouldn't expect to be selected for a world masters championship with only 5 weeks training after a 30 year absence.
    a local competition at the end of the year is one I have picked out as a possible.

    In answer to you question, The reason I restarted is not for grades/belts or medals far from it, in fact I never even thought about competing again.

    Early this year I attended my Sensai Don Werners funeral, there were well over 500 in attendance looking around I realised how many people I recognised from being a part of the club all those years ago, many had travelled from far away places, world Olympic European & national champions from Australia USA & all over Europe. For a sad occasion it was a great occasion & we talked about it for some days even weeks afterwards, but I wasn't going back.
    Until my daughter Chloe age 8 asked me if she could do judo, She is now in the beginners & loving every minute she did her first very much fun competition last week & won her first medal a bronze, she hasn't stopped talking about that, chuffed to bits. Taking her to training each week brought me back to the old days, & my interest in judo returned, slowly, & I began to think I would love to give it a go, maybe something I could do with my daughter. I dropped in one Wednesday senior class just to look & before long was in a spare kit & on the mat.  
    I havnt  missed a session since, & I can honestly say I am loving it, I have received such a warm welcome back, been reunited with old friends, been encouraged, & given selfless advice & coaching by some very good judoka & am enjoying the learning immensely I have taken out a licence re graded due to my past experience & mutually agreed to 3rd Kyu & I hope to gain 1st kyu by the end of this year & on to 1st Dan however long it takes & I have re joined the club. I am now back in the family!
    Do I have any regrets about not going back years ago? No way! I have had more success in cycling, & would never turn my back on that. I'm not looking back into the past, only the future.
    As for shodan, I have no ego's that's really something I want to do for myself, I have self believe, drive, a willingness to learn & others believe in me & that I can & should go for it.
    Don Werners words are ringing in my ears "Be better than your best"
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    Cichorei Kano

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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Cichorei Kano on Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:50 pm

    Don't forget that we also have JudoForum ranks !

    JudoSensei is Chair of the JudoForum Promotion Committee and Stacey probably sits on the promotion fees !  Very Happy 


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    "The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was." (Thomas Carlyle)
    "Nothing is as approved as mediocrity, the majority has established it and it fixes it fangs on whatever gets beyond it either way." (Blaise Pascal)
    "Quand on essaie, c'est difficile. Quand on n'essaie pas, c'est impossible" (Guess Who ?)
    "I am never wrong. Once I thought I was, and that was a mistake."

    Anatol

    Posts : 190
    Join date : 2014-01-20

    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Anatol on Sat Jun 21, 2014 9:44 pm



    "Opa Schutte", a dutch Judoka started Judo at 46, got his Shodan at 49, was in the 50ies and 60ies a great promoter and organizer for Judo Camps and went to 7th Dan in the 70ies. He was also known for his great Newaza.

    Judo is open ...


    I wish you all the best!




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    Re: Going for Shodan

    Post by Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Mon Oct 23, 2017 12:32 am