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    Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

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    noboru

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    Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by noboru on Mon Jun 30, 2014 1:41 am

    On the website of Jigoro Kano Memorial International Sport Institute contains some interesting documents about Jigoro Kano:

    PDF documents about Jigoro Kano life, scans of his calligraphies., etc.
    http://100yearlegacy.org/english/Kano_Jigoro/pdf/kj_panph_English.pdf

    Calligraphy and Philosophy of Prof. Jigoro Kano
    http://100yearlegacy.org/english/Kano_Jigoro/Calligraphy/

    Some examples:

    Jigoro Kano Memorial International Sport Institute wrote:
    “順道制勝 (Jyundô-Seïsyô).”
    This phrase highlights Kano’s belief that: “regardless of winning or losing, you need to follow the right path and, even if you lose by following this right path, it is more valuable than winning being against the path." (Jigoro Kano, “In the spirit of cultural philosophy of Kodokan Judo”, in Yuko-no Katsudou, Vol.8, No.2, 1922).

    常択最善志堅行力 (Kônan/甲南) (collection of Hyogo University of Teacher Education)
    Lectura: Tsune ni Saizen wo Erabi Kokorozashi Kataku Tsutomete Okonaü
    Significado: Siempre elige el mejor camino y haz un esfuerzo firme y determinante.

    成己益世 (Shinkosaï/進乎斎) (owned by Ms Asako Yokoyama)
    Reading: Onore wo Nashite Yo wo Ekisu
    Meaning: Putting the utmost effort to grow up to be a great person should come first and then contribute to the society

    修己治人 (Shinkosaï/進乎斎) (owned by Ms Asako Yokoyama)
    Reading: Onore wo Osame te Hito wo Osamu
    Meaning: Discipline oneself and govern others

    力必達 (Shinkosaï/進乎斎) (owned by Ms Setsuko Otaki)
    Reading: Tsutomu-reba Kanarazu Tassu
    Meaning: All effort shall pay off to achieve a goal

    擇道竭力 (Ki-Issaï/帰一斎) (owned by Mr Michio Tanimoto)
    Reading: Michi wo Erabi-te Chikara wo Tsukusu
    Meaning: One shall choose his way and do it to the best of his ability

    盡己竢成 ” (Ki-Issaï/帰一斎) (owned by Mr Michio Tanimoto)
    Reading: Onore wo Tsukushite Naru-wo Matsu
    Meaning: Do your best and await success

    教育之事天下莫偉焉 一人徳教広加万人 一世化育遠及百世 (Shinkosaï/進乎斎) (owned by Ms Asako Yokoyama)
    Reading: Kyoiku no Koto, Tenka Koreyori I-naru wa nashi
    Hitori no Tokkyo, Hiroku Ban-nin ni Kuwawari
    Isseï no Kaïku Tôku Hyakuseï ni Oyobu
    Meaning: Nothing under the sun is greater than education. By educating one person with virtue and sending him/her into the society of his/her generation, we make a contribution by extending a hundred generations to come.

    自他共栄 (Shinkosaï/進乎斎) (collection of University of Tsukuba)
    Reading: Jita-Kyoei
    Meaning: an attention to the mutual prosperity for oneself and others

    NBK

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    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by NBK on Mon Jun 30, 2014 10:32 am

    Kano shihan's scrolls have been cataloged pretty well; this is a partial list.

    In the old forum there was a long, interesting (at least to me... ) thread about the origins of those sayings. There was a Chinese gent in Switzerland that contributed quite a bit; unfortunately that was all lost.

    The discussion attempted to differentiate and identify the elements, phrases, and thoughts from Confucian, Taoist and Buddhist philosophies.

    NOTE: the terms
    (Kônan/甲南)
    (Shinkosaï/進乎斎)
    refer to different pen names Kano shihan used at different times of his life. There were more.

    NBK

    Cichorei Kano

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    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by Cichorei Kano on Mon Jun 30, 2014 11:52 am

    NBK wrote:Kano shihan's scrolls have been cataloged pretty well; this is a partial list.  

    In the old forum there was a long, interesting (at least to me... ) thread about the origins of those sayings.  There was a Chinese gent in Switzerland that contributed quite a bit; unfortunately that was all lost.  

    The discussion attempted to differentiate and identify the elements, phrases, and thoughts from  Confucian, Taoist and Buddhist philosophies.  

    NOTE: the terms
    (Kônan/甲南)
    (Shinkosaï/進乎斎)
    refer to different pen names Kano shihan used at different times of his life.  There were more.

    NBK


    Indeed, all now got sucked into the Einstein-Rosen Bridge that was created a couple of years ago ...

    For those interested in Kanô's caligraphies, note that most have something to do with education and that most that are offered on the market are fakes. As to the art of shodô itself, personally I don't think they are all that great. I think that Mifune's reflect more character. Still, Yamaoka Tesshû's calligraphic skills remains at a level of which one one can only dream ...


    _________________


    "The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was." (Thomas Carlyle)
    "Nothing is as approved as mediocrity, the majority has established it and it fixes it fangs on whatever gets beyond it either way." (Blaise Pascal)
    "Quand on essaie, c'est difficile. Quand on n'essaie pas, c'est impossible" (Guess Who ?)
    "I am never wrong. Once I thought I was, and that was a mistake."

    Anatol

    Posts : 181
    Join date : 2014-01-20

    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by Anatol on Mon Jun 30, 2014 8:23 pm

    Hi CK

    For those interested in Kanô's caligraphies, note that most have something to do with education and that most that are offered on the market are fakes. As to the art of shodô itself, personally I don't think they are all that great. I think that Mifune's reflect more character. Still, Yamaoka Tesshû's calligraphic skills remains at a level of which one one can only dream ...
    I agree completely. Thx for the hint to Yamaoka Tesshu - impressive life, very impressive caligraphies.


    Hi NBK

    In the old forum there was a long, interesting (at least to me... ) thread about the origins of those sayings. There was a Chinese gent in Switzerland that contributed quite a bit; unfortunately that was all lost.

    The discussion attempted to differentiate and identify the elements, phrases, and thoughts from Confucian, Taoist and Buddhist philosophies.
    If you mean the User "Wuji" - that was me. I do remember the discussion. It also included a poem of Katsu Kaishū, which I translated from Hanzi to English:


    With an empty mind
    (wu xin)
    enter
    the naturalness/ spontanity (ziran)
    of
    the mysterious/wounderful (miao = the offspring of all life, see Laozi 1)

    Without any action (wu wei)
    !
    after all
    (you will) transform (hua)
    to spirit (shen)



    I am not Chinese, but interested in philosophy of West and East. I translate Daoist Classics like the Neiye, the Laozi and the Zhuangzi and Tang Poems into German. The poem then was an eye opener for my Judo. I transformed the Judo Terms into Daoist Terms and this helped me a lot to do better Judo.

    Thx a lot for the discussions!



    .

    NBK

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    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by NBK on Mon Jun 30, 2014 10:58 pm

    Anatol wrote:Hi CK

    For those interested in Kanô's caligraphies, note that most have something to do with education and that most that are offered on the market are fakes. As to the art of shodô itself, personally I don't think they are all that great. I think that Mifune's reflect more character. Still, Yamaoka Tesshû's calligraphic skills remains at a level of which one one can only dream ...
    I agree completely. Thx for the hint to Yamaoka Tesshu - impressive life, very impressive caligraphies.

    Hi NBK

    In the old forum there was a long, interesting (at least to me... ) thread about the origins of those sayings. There was a Chinese gent in Switzerland that contributed quite a bit; unfortunately that was all lost.

    The discussion attempted to differentiate and identify the elements, phrases, and thoughts from Confucian, Taoist and Buddhist philosophies.
    If you mean the User "Wuji" - that was me. I do remember the discussion. It also included a poem of Katsu Kaishū, which I translated from Hanzi to English:

    With an empty mind
    (wu xin)
    enter
    the naturalness/ spontanity (ziran)
    of
    the mysterious/wounderful (miao = the offspring of all life, see Laozi 1)
    Without any action (wu wei) !
    after all
    (you will) transform (hua)
    to spirit (shen)

    I am not Chinese, but interested in philosophy of West and East. I translate Daoist Classics like the Neiye, the Laozi and the Zhuangzi and Tang Poems into German. The poem then was an eye opener for my Judo. I transformed the Judo Terms into Daoist Terms and this helped me a lot to do better Judo.

    Thx a lot for the discussions!
    .
    AnatolWuji!  Many a time I wish I could recover that thread (actually I may have it someplace.....).  I believe I thanked you but if not, thank you again for your contributions.

    It's interesting that you speak of Tang dynasty poems.  The only poems that ever spoke to me were Tang dynasty soldier poems - tales of gents over 1500 years ago feeling the same as I did finding myself on the far side of the planet from home and hearth.    

    Actually, I continued research of neo-Confucianism in a different direction, as Kano's calligraphy is so limited in length and context, it's probably a fool's errand to get a clear read from only a couple of lines.  My little friend CK and I discussed Kano shihan's neo-Confucian influenced thoughts (is / is not = ≠ religion??) and battled to a stalemate, if you saw the thread on Kano's Religion - Again.  (I won - but don't tell him, we'll never hear the end of it.....)  

    Since then I've been reading down a different path, and dug up interesting references I'll send you via PM. These could be more to your interest.  

    And, if you think Yamaoka is interesting, check out his relationship with Katsu Kaishu - but there's not much in English.  Probably the most detailed available in English is Romulus Hillsboro's book on Katsu Kaishu, which is entertaining but not first class history (nor does it claim to be....)  You get to wade through a bunch of complex history but Yamaoka played a pivotal role in Katsu Kaishu's key role in Japanese history.

    NBK

    PS - a separate thread on your translation of 'judo terms into Daoist terms' would be very interesting, I think.  Please consider it. Recently I posted a post in another forum on the connection between judo, ju no ri, aiki, and Confucianism, according to a senior student of Kano shihan.

    Anatol

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    Join date : 2014-01-20

    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by Anatol on Wed Jul 02, 2014 8:03 am

    Hi NBK


    Tang Poems are old and modern in both ways.

    This Link has a collection of "Wen Gu" (old scriptures, classics), including Confucian, Daoist and Military and the


    300 Tang Poems


    Judo Terms transformed to Daoist Terms includes:

    Wuji (empty and open beginning)
    zheng (upright)
    shui (water)
    ben (root)
    ruo (soft, flexible, supporting)
    wu xin (empty heart/mind)
    qi (breathing)
    jing (essence, energy)
    multiple yin / yang

    naturalness (ziran)
    simplicity (pu)

    qing jing shen (clear and calm spirit)

    De (virtue, arete)
    Shu


    (zheng is actually confucian)


    PS - a separate thread on your translation of 'judo terms into Daoist terms' would be very interesting, I think.  Please consider it.
    I would, if this forum were in German. My English is good enough for talking about weather or the stock markets but not for a lenghty, detailed philosophical debate nor for an essay or a study. To read even complicated thoughts and arguments is no problem at all so many thx for your contributions and links to interesting topics!


    .

    Cichorei Kano

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    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by Cichorei Kano on Wed Jul 02, 2014 9:42 am

    Oh, but Tang-Dynasty poetry has indeed a lot to offer.

    Don't forget Japanese waka, tanka and renga, but with the stupid adoption of haiku by laypeople who make these horrendous Western language things that aren't haiku but that mathematically adhere to the haiku structure, the latter has received a totally distorted amount of attention ..

    Reminds me of judo kata: not knowing what it is about, and thinking that just because one applies the 5-7-5 mechanics everyone thinks they can make haiku.


    _________________


    "The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was." (Thomas Carlyle)
    "Nothing is as approved as mediocrity, the majority has established it and it fixes it fangs on whatever gets beyond it either way." (Blaise Pascal)
    "Quand on essaie, c'est difficile. Quand on n'essaie pas, c'est impossible" (Guess Who ?)
    "I am never wrong. Once I thought I was, and that was a mistake."

    Anatol

    Posts : 181
    Join date : 2014-01-20

    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by Anatol on Wed Jul 02, 2014 8:37 pm

    Very well said CK!

    To follow only an outer structural principle without knowing or much better to incorporate (via exercices, learning, thinking, discussing) the inner ones is only mimicry. As for kata also for poetry and especially for haiku it is important to empty your mind (daoist) , but you have to learn und fill a lot, before you can empty. Extend learning und practice is a confician thought. Kongzi says, that with learning and repetition (the classics, study the old ones) you will get not only filled with the classic thoughts, you too get the structure and the principles (both called Li) of the right way. Its a learning from outside to fill and structure the inside, so your inside has the structure and principles (Li) of the outside (world, way, virtue, harmony).

    As you said, the attraction of Haiku  to amateurs is the simple outer structure, the very short form (you dont have to write an essay, a novel or a drama), even "open up to all", if the only thing you know is the 5 - 7 -5, and haiku sounds so deep and mysterious, sophisticated and spiritual.

    Said this, there are some good Haiku "composers" in German language and most of them are very educated with a feeling of rhythm, structure, nature, open spaces, simplicity, precision, surprise, turn, resonance.

    NBK

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    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by NBK on Sun Jul 13, 2014 2:37 pm

    Kano shihan often dispersed proverbs from ancient texts and his own coined phrases in his correspondence.  I recently found a long list.  Some examples with a couple of my poor translations:

    我心匪右不可轉 - From the Cypress Boat section of the Classic of Poetry - 'My mind is not a stone; It cannot be rolled about' addressing the difficulty of affecting your own mind versus the physical world.  

    和敬 - short version of 和敬清寂 Wa, Kei, Sei, Jaku - “harmony, respect, purity, tranquility” the principles of the tea ceremony

    我忘吾 - I forget my self

    尺有所短, 寸有所長 - the Western equivalent would be "sometimes a foot may prove short while an inch may prove long." The fortune teller told Qu Yuan about injustice in life and how the outcome can depend on you alone, not the intervention of the heavens (principles or fate).  
      
    志士於道而耻悪衣悪食者未足興議也 - Confucius said, “Even a person who aspires to pursue his studies, if he feels shame at poor clothes and meals, is not worthy to discuss.”

    山高水長 - Song dynasty era poet 范仲淹 Fan Zhongyan writing that the sages' morality is as 'Tall as the mountains, as eternal as the flowing waters'  

    流芳 - your name survives you

    主一無適 - a neo-Confucian saying about focusing on one thing / not dispersing your attention

    流水不腐、戸樞不蠧 - flowing water does not stagnant, a door hinge does not become worm-eaten (A rolling stone gathers no moss....)

    As CK noted, there are many references to water, flowing, etc.

    NBK

    Cichorei Kano

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    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by Cichorei Kano on Sun Jul 13, 2014 3:32 pm

    NBK wrote:Kano shihan often dispersed proverbs from ancient texts and his own coined phrases in his correspondence.  I recently found a long list.  Some examples with a couple of my poor translations:

    我心匪右不可轉 - From the Cypress Boat section of the Classic of Poetry - 'My mind is not a stone; It cannot be rolled about' addressing the difficulty of affecting your own mind versus the physical world.  

    和敬 - short version of 和敬清寂 Wa, Kei, Sei, Jaku - “harmony, respect, purity, tranquility” the principles of the tea ceremony

    我忘吾 - I forget my self

    尺有所短, 寸有所長 - the Western equivalent would be "sometimes a foot may prove short while an inch may prove long." The fortune teller told Qu Yuan about injustice in life and how the outcome can depend on you alone, not the intervention of the heavens (principles or fate).  
      
    志士於道而耻悪衣悪食者未足興議也 - Confucius said, “Even a person who aspires to pursue his studies, if he feels shame at poor clothes and meals, is not worthy to discuss.”

    山高水長 - Song dynasty era poet 范仲淹 Fan Zhongyan writing that the sages' morality is as 'Tall as the mountains, as eternal as the flowing waters'  

    流芳 - your name survives you

    主一無適 - a neo-Confucian saying about focusing on one thing / not dispersing your attention

    流水不腐、戸樞不蠧 - flowing water does not stagnant, a door hinge does not become worm-eaten (A rolling stone gathers no moss....)

    As CK noted, there are many references to water, flowing, etc.

    NBK


    Thanks for posting these. Did you also find kakejiku by Kanô for these aphorisms and proverbs ?

    I am always in awe of well-read Chinese and Japanese scholars trained in the Chinese Classics and Chinese or Japanese literature. It leads to much inspiration and amazing images represent a confluence between artistry and activity. My concern is when they start building extensive projects around such images they sometimes seem to fail to distinguish poetry/fantasy from science. I had to think of a cat and how watching a cat could lead to endless extrapolations about how we should move in the martial arts, etc. Heck we could attempt to create ukemi based on cats and argue that if we land on all fours we will be saved injury. Sometimes I think that this is the process of thought of many Asian masters of the past follow. But then there is hard science, and hard science says: "forget it". Why ? Because the spine of a cat is anatomically and physically built very different from that of a human and has the ability to dissipate enormous amount of energy; a human spine can't and would be damaged and broken by only a small fraction of what a cat's spine can sustain in shocks, because the human spine would have no way of getting rid of that enormous amount of energy. There's the mismatch between a rationale perfectly acceptable in the thinking pattern of many masters, yet completely absurd from scientific point of view.

    Kanô's obsession with water is intriguing, exciting even, but one must be acutely aware of the limits of its application and that of other poetic images to jûdô. Sometimes I think that Kanô instead of indulging himself in classics and philosophic thinkers would have better spent some of his time reading and studying Bernouilli.


    _________________


    "The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was." (Thomas Carlyle)
    "Nothing is as approved as mediocrity, the majority has established it and it fixes it fangs on whatever gets beyond it either way." (Blaise Pascal)
    "Quand on essaie, c'est difficile. Quand on n'essaie pas, c'est impossible" (Guess Who ?)
    "I am never wrong. Once I thought I was, and that was a mistake."

    NBK

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    Join date : 2013-01-10
    Location : Tokyo, Japan

    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by NBK on Sun Jul 13, 2014 8:06 pm

    Cichorei Kano wrote:
    Thanks for posting these. Did you also find kakejiku by Kanô for these aphorisms and proverbs ?

    I am always in awe of well-read Chinese and Japanese scholars trained in the Chinese Classics and Chinese or Japanese literature. It leads to much inspiration and amazing images represent a confluence between artistry and activity. My concern is when they start building extensive projects around such images they sometimes seem to fail to distinguish poetry/fantasy from science. I had to think of a cat and how watching a cat could lead to endless extrapolations about how we should move in the martial arts, etc. Heck we could attempt to create ukemi based on cats and argue that if we land on all fours we will be saved injury. Sometimes I think that this is the process of thought of many Asian masters of the past follow. But then there is hard science, and hard science says: "forget it". Why ?  Because the spine of a cat is anatomically and physically built very different from that of a human and has the ability to dissipate enormous amount of energy; a human spine can't and would be damaged and broken by only a small fraction of what a cat's spine can sustain in shocks, because the human spine would have no way of getting rid of that enormous amount of energy. There's the mismatch between a rationale perfectly acceptable in the thinking pattern of many masters, yet completely absurd from scientific point of view.

    Kanô's obsession with water is intriguing, exciting even, but one must be acutely aware of the limits of its application and that of other poetic images to jûdô. Sometimes I think that Kanô instead of indulging himself in classics and philosophic thinkers would have better spent some of his time reading and studying Bernouilli.
    The list includes a number written by Kano as kakejiku, but as they are well known, I didn't bother citing them. My impression, as it is not clear, that this list was derived from a number of sources including private correspondence.

    Regarding Kano and his interest in water - I can't imagine anyone today* taking that literally. I even have a hard time thinking that Kano took it literally.

    NBK
    *Well, now that I think of it, I take that back.... I can imagine some people today - after all there are any number of people that take ninjers and mikkyo as the source of strength, etc.

    noboru

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    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by noboru on Mon Apr 13, 2015 12:39 am



    http://www.goko.kumamoto-u.ac.jp/data_2.html

    「順道制勝行不害人」の扁額
     明治24年、31歳での若さで着任した第三代校長嘉納治五郎による書で、自らが創始した講道館柔道の極致を表したものといわれている。文武両道に秀でた人として生徒たちの人望を集めた。昭和13年JOC委員として東京オリンピックの招致に成功したがアメリカからの帰国の途中氷川丸船上で肺炎にかかり5月5日死去した当年79歳であった。


    english translation from Google translator Smile :
    Hengaku of "Jun-do-sei Katsuyuki not harm people."
    1891, in the third generation principal Jigoro Kano written by who arrived at the young in the 31-year-old, it is said that the himself expressed the Kodokan Judo of perfection that was the originator. I have collected the popularity of students as people who excel in Bunburyodo. Were successful bid of Tokyo Olympics as 1938 JOC committee but was Hikawamaru 79-year-old year that died May 5 takes to pneumonia on board during the return from the United States.

    noboru

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    順道制勝 Jundo-Seisho

    Post by noboru on Mon Apr 13, 2015 12:44 am

    順道制勝 Jundo-Seisho



    from http://blog.livedoor.jp/himejyu/archives/51728684.html

    NBK

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    Re: Jigoro Kano and themes of his calligraphy

    Post by NBK on Mon Apr 13, 2015 3:01 am

    noboru wrote:

    http://www.goko.kumamoto-u.ac.jp/data_2.html

    「順道制勝行不害人」の扁額
     明治24年、31歳での若さで着任した第三代校長嘉納治五郎による書で、自らが創始した講道館柔道の極致を表したものといわれている。文武両道に秀でた人として生徒たちの人望を集めた。昭和13年JOC委員として東京オリンピックの招致に成功したがアメリカからの帰国の途中氷川丸船上で肺炎にかかり5月5日死去した当年79歳であった。


    english translation from Google translator  Smile  :
    Hengaku of "Jun-do-sei Katsuyuki not harm people."
    1891, in the third generation principal Jigoro Kano written by who arrived at the young in the 31-year-old, it is said that the himself expressed the Kodokan Judo of perfection that was the originator. I have collected the popularity of students as people who excel in Bunburyodo. Were successful bid of Tokyo Olympics as 1938 JOC committee but was Hikawamaru 79-year-old year that died May 5 takes to pneumonia on board during the return from the United States.
    The reference is to Kano shihan when he was the third principal of the 5th High School in Kumamoto. A hengaku is a framed motto or quote.

    noboru

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    the meaning of part calligraphy 行不害人

    Post by noboru on Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:09 pm

    NBK: I'm sorry, please can you explain the meaning of part calligraphy 行不害人 ?
    行不害人 ??? Gyofu Gaijin ??? "link not harm people" ???

    Is this the meaning?
    順道制勝行不害人 - Jundo Seisho Gyofu Gaijin - 順道制勝 Jundo Seisho "Achieve the goal, realize great results." 行不害人 Gyofu Gaijin "The Best Behaviour Harms No One"

    "Achieve the goal, realize great results with the best behaviour harms no one."

    Thank you a lot.

    I found some story ( in japanese ) about this calligraphy.
    For example: http://www.goko.kumamoto-u.ac.jp/b03.html

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