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    A technical-pedagogical and historical reflection on the conceptual and biomechanical properties of Kōdōkan jūdō's “ko-uchi-gari” [minor inner reaping throw]

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    noboru

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    A technical-pedagogical and historical reflection on the conceptual and biomechanical properties of Kōdōkan jūdō's “ko-uchi-gari” [minor inner reaping throw]

    Post by noboru on Wed Jul 09, 2014 6:35 pm

    A technical-pedagogical and historical reflection on the conceptual and biomechanical properties of Kōdōkan jūdō's “ko-uchi-gari” [minor inner reaping throw]. Comprehensive Psychology: Volume 1, Issue .
    http://www.amsciepub.com/doi/pdf/10.2466/05.25.CP.1.1

    finarashi

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    Re: A technical-pedagogical and historical reflection on the conceptual and biomechanical properties of Kōdōkan jūdō's “ko-uchi-gari” [minor inner reaping throw]

    Post by finarashi on Thu Jul 10, 2014 4:02 pm

    Extremely good read. Makes you understand that there is a deeper knowledge level that can be acquired. But knowing the authors I am not surprised.

    Highly recommended.


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    noboru

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    kuzushi / tsukuri, zanshin

    Post by noboru on Thu Jul 10, 2014 6:04 pm

    Yes, there are some interesting explanations of phases of judo nagewaza techniques.

    I want to discuss some of these phases more...

    Debana 出端 -
    Carl De Crée and David A. Edmonds wrote:[The opportunity and optimal moment to succeed]

    I did not hear in judo about it before reading of this article. This term is new in judo for me. I know this term from kendo - there is Debana waza - set of technigues of cutting an opponent before they can fully execute their cut. As a kendoka commits to an attack, they may expose a target.


    About debana ->kuzushi/tsukuri - relations ...
    I study the Daigo book about nagewaza throwing or sources about Nage no kata - there are explantion of phases for preparing of the uke before kuzushi/tsukuri for each techniques or their variants - Tori is creating the specific situation in uke behaviour for applying good nagewaza (an action starts from me/ uke reacts -> and next is our tsukuri/kuzushi and kake).

    My more experiences from more judo matches in the past told me, that very good judokas can create the situations for applying their tokui/nagewaza very well.
    Can I say, that their DEBANA was excellent? Is it true?

    Kuzushi - tsukuri - on the website of Kodokan Judo Institute is interesting explanation, it look like that theirs view is as the kuzushi is part of tsukuri  - not separately phases kuzushi->tsukuri->kake - if I understand well ... it is very similar/same with Hiranos description from pdf about Kouchigari above ...
    Kodokan Judo Institute wrote:
    "Waza (Technique)
    Waza is based on the fundamental principle of Judo, that is, "Maximum Efficient Use of Mind and Body". The theories of Tsukuri and Kake are expressing the principle from Waza's viewpoint.

    Tsukuri is made up of Kuzushi which means to destroy your opponent's posture or balance, and "holding yourself ready" to make your attack easier.
    To actually apply your contemplated technique, when his posture has already been broken by Tsukuri, is called Kake. Tsukuri and Kake can also be called technical principles of Judo.


    While you are practicing Tsukuri and Kake, both depend upon the fundamental principle of "Mutual welfare and benefit" and "Maximum efficiency," you can understand and master the principle which can be applied to all phases of human life. You proceed from Waza to Way by practicing Judo."

    http://www.kodokan.org/e_basic/waza.html


    Zanshin 残心 (Awareness)
    from Judo Channel page (webpages of Token and the All Japan Judo Federation ("Zenjuren"))

    Zenjuren pages wrote:"Zanshin" (Awareness) is a term from Japan's martial arts. To be in a Zanshin (Awareness) state, is to remain on guard to the end, keeping one's concentration focused.
    The moment after executing what appears to be a successful Waza, a contestant may relax his guard, thus presenting the opponent with a chance to counter. A contestant must therefore remain focused until the win has been completely secured. For example, after using a Nage waza (Throwing techniques), etc., to successfully throw an opponent, the contestant's focus may be on the fallen opponent, when he should in fact be focusing on a follow-up Waza. The state in which one remains focused at all times is called "Zanshin" (Awareness).
    The Zanshin (Awareness) concept is also used in the Japanese arts such as the tea ceremony and Japanese dance, etc. Someone who loses focus before something is completed (e.g., forgetting to close a sliding door), may be accused of "Lacking Zanshin (Awareness)". The roots of Zanshin (Awareness) lie in the concept of being always conscious of the beauty in a given procedure.
    http://www.judo-ch.jp/english/dictionary/terms/zansin/

    There is very nice video from Olympic Games 1964 from judo final match Geesink (NED) - Kaminaga (JPN). Geesing throws with Hiza guruma, control the Kaminagas falling and fluently he continues with katame waza.
    Judo Tokyo 1964: Geesink (NED) - Kaminaga (JPN)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErBskc8opN0


    We can see in the modern judo matches that there is not zanshin more often. The competitors looking for judges after throwing often. In other Budo as iaido or kendo is zanshin very important and the technigues arent good or valid without zanshin. One target of these Budo is cultivating the zanshin state ...


    Some more interesting about Zanshin and other Budo terms are in english/french terms in the book (Pascal Krieger, Jôdô la voie du batôn/ the way of the stick) from Pascal Krieger (sensei of Shinto Muso ryu jodo, judo and iaido from Switzerland).
    Pascal Krieger, Jôdô la voie du batôn/ the way of the stick
    Link to pdf book is here http://www.mediafire.com/?oh0ncxmmgzj and it is oficial from FEI pages http://www.fej.ch/en/news.htm


    Last edited by noboru on Thu Jul 10, 2014 10:16 pm; edited 6 times in total (Reason for editing : added texts about debana, small changes)

    Ryvai

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    Re: A technical-pedagogical and historical reflection on the conceptual and biomechanical properties of Kōdōkan jūdō's “ko-uchi-gari” [minor inner reaping throw]

    Post by Ryvai on Thu Jul 10, 2014 6:27 pm

    Wow, thanks for posting. That was a good article Smile

    noboru

    Posts : 553
    Join date : 2013-08-26
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    Location : Czech Republic

    more information about term debana

    Post by noboru on Tue Nov 18, 2014 8:10 pm

    noboru wrote:
    About debana ->kuzushi/tsukuri - relations ...

    I understand a little more the concept debana from this document. I could be help to other people too.

    Nanatsunokata,
    Endōnokata,
    and Jōgenokata
    ―A pedagogical and
    qualitative biomechanical evaluation of Hirano Tokio’s kuzushi
    (unbalancing) concept as part of skill acquisition for throwing
    techniques in Kōdōkan jūdō

    http://revpubli.unileon.es/ojs/index.php/artesmarciales/article/download/1162/1057

    noboru

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    Join date : 2013-08-26
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    butsukari 打つかり

    Post by noboru on Wed Jul 29, 2015 1:03 am

    Carl DE CRÉE in his amazing work "Nanatsunokata, Endōnokata,and Jōgenokata ―A pedagogical and qualitative biomechanical evaluation of Hirano Tokio’s kuzushi (unbalancing) concept as part of skill acquisition for throwing techniques in Kōdōkan jūdō" writes about term butsukari just tle little bit.

    Carl DE CRÉE wrote:"From a biomechanical view, successful kuzushi involves, or … at least is closely intertwined with a twofold process, namely the debana14 出端 (the opportunity and optimal moment to succeed), and a final contact or body collision or clash called butsukari15 打つかり. These two steps immediately precede the kake or execution of the throwing phase and the nageru or actual throwing phase 16."

    Carl DE CRÉE wrote:"15 Sacripanti uses the term ikioi 勢い to refer to this body collision. However, body collision in jūdō is actually butsukari 打つかり whereas ikioi 勢い simply points out that an action is done “vigorously and forcefully”."

    One of my judo teacher Vladimir Kocman (czech nationality, 5.dan, 2.place WC 1983, 3.place OG 1980, 3.place WC 1983) spoke about Butsugari during our Keiko's offen. He told us, that Butsugari during his Keiko's  with japanese top judoka's around year 1980 (Saito Hiroshi, Yamashita Yasuhiro, etc.) were paintfull ( their chests/shoulders collision ) -  during Osotogari and next some from Nage waza Uchikomi. In Vladimir Kocman's judo was Butsugari important part of Kuzushi in some throwing techniques.

    I found one video with Yasuhiro Yamashita as example. - time 2:15 for example

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