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    Osaekomi circle

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    Ryvai

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    Osaekomi circle

    Post by Ryvai on Wed Sep 10, 2014 3:00 am

    I was wondering if there exists some way of expressing an continual, never-ending or osaekomi-pattern in circles in Japanese?

    In a pedagogical approach to teaching osaekomi-waza our federation often refer to the "osaekomi circle" which consists of something like 5 osaekomi-waza what are performed with uke escaping the first (usually kesa-gatame) and tori proceeds to the next osaekomi to prevent uke from escaping (toketa). Tori is in control the entire time, and is an agreed upon exercise with a partner, a sort of sotai-renshu or yaku-soku-geiko?

    Would it be possible to call this type of exercise something like; sotai-renshu-no-ensō or would that make absolutely no sense? I like the ensō (circle) for it's meaning of something like; 'moment when the mind is free to let the body create'.

    Mukai Mikihiro-sensei performing osaekomi-waza in a circle-pattern:


    ensō symbol:
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    Cichorei Kano

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    Re: Osaekomi circle

    Post by Cichorei Kano on Wed Sep 10, 2014 3:10 am

    Ryvai wrote:I was wondering if there exists some way of expressing an continual, never-ending or osaekomi-pattern in circles in Japanese?

    In a pedagogical approach to teaching osaekomi-waza our federation often refer to the "osaekomi circle" which consists of something like 5 osaekomi-waza what are performed with uke escaping the first (usually kesa-gatame) and tori proceeds to the next osaekomi to prevent uke from escaping (toketa). Tori is in control the entire time, and is an agreed upon exercise with a partner, a sort of sotai-renshu or yaku-soku-geiko?

    Would it be possible to call this type of exercise something like; sotai-renshu-no-ensō or would that make absolutely no sense? I like the ensō (circle) for it's meaning of something like; 'moment when the mind is free to let the body create'.

    Mukai Mikihiro-sensei performing osaekomi-waza in a circle-pattern:

    ensō symbol:

    It's simply called renraku-waza performed in newaza, just like there is kaeshi-waza performed in newaza. The geometric pattern described depends on many things and is not per definition a circle, but could equally be an ellipsoid, a triangle, Bernoulli's lemniscate or a clothoid loop.

    As to the general idea of constructing neologisms in Japanese by people who neither speak Japanese nor master Japanese linguistics I would have hoped that the sense of that is sort of self-explanatory, although perhaps in the UK you could find some to back up the opposite view, although it is not clear to me exactly what they would be backing up with the opposite view.

    Drawing in the concept of ensō to me resembles pseudo-mysthicism that is better left in the ninjer domain. All we have hear really are the biomechanics of pressure applied in renraku-waza.


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    Ryvai

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    Re: Osaekomi circle

    Post by Ryvai on Wed Sep 10, 2014 7:47 am

    Cichorei Kano wrote:It's simply called renraku-waza performed in newaza, just like there is kaeshi-waza performed in newaza. The geometric pattern described depends on many things and is not per definition a circle, but could equally be an ellipsoid, a triangle, Bernoulli's lemniscate or a clothoid loop.

    As to the general idea of constructing neologisms in Japanese by people who neither speak Japanese nor master Japanese linguistics I would have hoped that the sense of that is sort of self-explanatory, although perhaps in the UK you could find some to back up the opposite view, although it is not clear to me exactly what they would be backing up with the opposite view.

    Drawing in the concept of ensō to me resembles pseudo-mysthicism that is better left in the ninjer domain. All we have hear really are the biomechanics of pressure applied in renraku-waza.

    I was hoping there was such a term somewhere to explain this type of drill. I guess I'm out of luck then Smile

    In the UK they have such crazy names for waza, it makes my eyes bleed from time to time reading them, I see your point there. What about the word; Rūpu, Wa (輪) or Mugen Rūpu (無限ループ). Can any of these be put together into something descriptive of a pattern of an exercise that goes in a loop? You kind of end up at the place you started, with renraku-waza of osaekomi in-between.

    EDIT: The video is not just a demonstration of random osaekomi-waza, it is a drill where you practice several osaekomi-waza with an uke trying to escape in a pre-defined pattern, and you end up where you started and can continue until you get really, really hungry or thirsty. It is very good for kids to learn this way, like the osaekomi part of katame-no-kata Smile

    tafftaz

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    Re: Osaekomi circle

    Post by tafftaz on Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:21 am

    Ryvai, not all in the UK use the names given to the techniques used in the "kokushiai waza".
    These are the waza named for a "competition" syllabus by a high ranking judoka.
    While I do not agree with the terminology, as do many others in the UK, the judoka himself is very well respected and a very good judo man.
    I have been to numerous clubs throughout the UK and have never heard any of these names used in normal practise.
    Every other set  ie renraku, renzoku, kaeshiwaza are fairly standard.
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    Jonesy

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    Re: Osaekomi circle

    Post by Jonesy on Mon Dec 22, 2014 11:02 am

    Have a look at the Guruma-no-kata or Groundwork Wheel as per Sampson Sampson, WJF 8 dan and JFA UK Technical Director.





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    Ryvai

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    Re: Osaekomi circle

    Post by Ryvai on Mon Dec 22, 2014 8:03 pm

    Jonesy wrote:Have a look at the Guruma-no-kata or Groundwork Wheel as per Sampson Sampson, WJF 8 dan and JFA UK Technical Director.




    Thanks! I've been looking for something like this. I was wondering what other federations called similar exercises. Using it as a form of kata is one way of doing it I guess Smile
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    NBK

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    Re: Osaekomi circle

    Post by NBK on Tue Dec 23, 2014 10:28 pm

    Great fun, thanks!


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