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    The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

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    Jonesy

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    The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Jonesy on Mon Mar 30, 2015 3:54 am

    An article entitled "The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)" written by Petr Brezina and edited by Llŷr Jones, has been published in Issue 25 of the Bulletin of the Kano Society.

    http://www.kanosociety.org/Bulletins/pdf%20bulletins/bulletinx25.pdf

    noboru

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    info from rare book Fundamentals of Jiu-jitsu (1936/37) by Stefan Fülöp

    Post by noboru on Fri Jul 31, 2015 1:03 am

    I received today some new informations and photos about Mr. F.S.Dobó (Istfán (Stefan) Fülöp alias Dobó). I will add some new photos or link to them here in next days:
    Photos about:
    - first European Judo/Jiujitsu Championship held at the Kristal Palast in Dresden, Germany (1934)
    - Jigoro Kano's teachings in Prague (year 1936)
    - from Ichiro Hatta, Sugiyama and Sarah Mayer teachings in Prague (year 1935)
    - common photo Gunji Koizumi and F.S.Dobó
    - next others .

    All is from czech rare book Fundamentals of Jiu-jitsu (1936/37) by Stefan Fülöp (S.F. Dobó). I could't get this book in time of writing article. I think that exist only few pieces today.

    noboru

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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by noboru on Sat Aug 01, 2015 3:53 am

    Here is a link to photos:
    http://judonokenkyu.blog.cz/1507/dalsi-fotograficke-stripky-k-historii-dzudo-v-ceskoslovensku

    Jonesy

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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Jonesy on Sat Aug 01, 2015 6:27 am

    noboru wrote:Here is a link to photos:
    http://judonokenkyu.blog.cz/1507/dalsi-fotograficke-stripky-k-historii-dzudo-v-ceskoslovensku
    Fascinating and of real historical interest.

    noboru

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    direct links to

    Post by noboru on Tue Aug 04, 2015 1:00 am

    Jonesy wrote:Fascinating and of real historical interest.

    Thank you. The photos confirm  lot of informations from article in Kano Society Bulletin (Nb.25)

    Here are direct links to photos which could be interesting forn this forum visitors:

    - first European Judo/Jiujitsu Championship held at the Kristal Palast in Dresden, Germany (30.11. - 2.12. 1934)


    - Jigoro Kano's teachings in Prague (year 1936 - he visited Prague on the way from Olympic Games in Berlin - September 1936 )


    - Ichiro Hatta, Kenji Sugiyama teachings in Prague (year 1935)


    -Sarah Mayer and F.S.Dobó - Sarah Mayer come to Prague from Japan with Ichiro Hatta's group (she was shodan in judo)


    - common photo Gunji Koizumi and F.S.Dobó


    F.S.Dobo and his teaching in Czechoslovakia before Second World War
    teaching of prison guards in the city Znojmo

    teachings for university students (in Prague)


    - japanese Charge deAffaires Mr. Noboru Ogawa is presented the F.S.Dobó teachings - Noboru Ogawa was great supporter of czechoslovak jujutsu/judokas. He suplied more judo explanations for them, he bring some judo literatures (japanese), invited some japanese judokas for visit of the Czechoslovakia

    noboru

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    Jigoro Kano in Prague in 1936 - photo

    Post by noboru on Tue Sep 22, 2015 7:23 pm

    I was able to identify several people in the picture from a visit Jigoro Kano in Prague in 1936 (late August / early September). Prague visited the route of the Olympic Games in Berlin, a lecture and instruction began judo training in the school year 1936-1937 in Section college sport in Prague.

    http://judoberoun.cz/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/75_let_juda_v_cr_pict02.jpg


    In the photo from left: unknown Japanese man, Dr. Gerolf Coudenhove-Kalergi (Secretary of the Japanese ambassador, his mother was famous Mitsuko Aojama/Coudenhove-Kalergi), František Smotlacha (known mycologist and a director of college sport in Prague), Jigoro Kano, F.S. Dobó (lead judoka/jiujitsuka in Czechoslovakia), japanese Charge de Affaires Dr. Noboru Ogawa, an unknown man from the Czech Republic.

    Reinberger

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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Reinberger on Wed Mar 09, 2016 11:25 pm

    As it seems, there were some "even earlier" days, when, even prior to WWI,  the country was still part of the Austro-Hungarien monarchy, and at least one Russian taught "Jiu-Jitsu (Ju-Do)" in Pilsen (Plzeň), for example. Of course, the country neither was called Czechoslovakia, nor Czech Republic back then.


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    noboru

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    jiujitsu practicing in Czech kingdom from 1907

    Post by noboru on Thu Mar 10, 2016 1:36 am

    Hi Reinberger,
    thank you a lot for your note.

    Reinberger wrote:As it seems, there were some "even earlier" days, when, even prior to WWI,  the country was still part of the Austro-Hungarien monarchy, and at least one Russian taught "Jiu-Jitsu (Ju-Do)" in Pilsen (Plzeň), for example.
    Please can you tell me more, it is interesting and czech sources have not these informations ?

    I have text written in year 1936 from Dr. Frantisek Smotlacha. It is about jiujitsu history in Czech Kingdom (part of Austro-Hungarien monarchy to end of WWI) in this time. In year 1907 was created the small group in university sport Prague, they had not any teachers, only leaders (F. Smotlacha, school inspector Mr.Klenka). They had the german release the book from Hancook and Higashi "Das Kano Jiu-Jitsu" (F.Smotlacha buyed it them), some translations of books from A.Cherpillod. Later 1920 they had any books from Mr. Vary. In the year 1925 the new czechoslovak army released book "MNO Sebeobrana" (MNO Selfdefence). The jiujitsu is practiced more in YMCA, private schools, sport clubs, police clubs.  The studying was from books only.
    The similar situation was to year 1933/1934. In this year the hungarian man S.F.Dobo moved to Prague and started teaching of jiujitsu in Budokwai way and it was correct start from judo learning...

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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Reinberger on Thu Mar 10, 2016 5:14 am

    noboru wrote:Please can you tell me more, it is interesting and czech sources have not these informations?

    Of course, noboru.

    1. In an issue from 1909, the "Pilsner Tagblatt" reported:

    "Der Meister des Jiu-Jitsu, der japanischen  Selbstverteidigungsmethode, ist in Marienbad eingetroffen und wird hier einen Kurs für diese praktische Methode der Selbstverteidigung eröffnen. Herr Sumakow hat bereits in vielen Städten die Polizeimannschaft in dieser Art ausgebildet."

    "The master of Jiu-Jitsu, the Japanese method of self defence, arrived in Marienbad (Mariánské Lázně) and will open here a course of this practical method of self defence. Mr. Sumakow already has trained the police squad in many towns in that method."

    In fact, around that time, Alexander Sumakow appeared in several newspapers of the k. & k. monarchy as a teacher of self defence, holding courses for the police corps of different cities (of Bozen [Bolcano] and Innsbruck, for example, and obviously also of Hungarian cities). As he still sojourned in Hungary when WWI broke out, and therefore as citizen of a hostile nation, he was interned at Esztergom in 1914 as a POW.

    2. In another issue, this time from 1910, the "Pilsner Tagblatt" again wrote about a demonstration by Wladimir Kasulakow, another Russian teacher of Jiu Jitsu. About Kasulakow, there exist even more newspaper-articles from different towns and nations, from the time before and after WWI. (Austria-Hungary, Belgium, France and the Netherlands. I own a book from the late 1920ies, written by a police officer of the last country, which shows Kasulakows "W.K.-System", with an older Kasulakow himself demonstrating the techniques. In other notices about him, in addition to "Jiu-Jitsu", the expression "Ju-Do" is also used in brackets. There's also one article, that mentions Kasulakow as "holder of the black belt".

    The purpose of the aforementioned demonstration was a "certainly very compelling" (as it was written) object-lesson, because there existed an intention, to have him train the police squad, obviously in Pilsen (Plzeň), like he (also) had already done in many cities. Interestingly, and in addition to the police, Kasulakow during that courses often also taught holds to rescue injured or unconscious people from hazard zones to emergency forces and fire-fighters.

    3. Also in an issue from 1910, the "Teplitz-Schönauer Anzeiger" mentions Kasulakow to have taught the police of Karlsbad (Karlovy Vary) and Fischern (Rybáře), and that a final examination in "Dschiu-Dschitsu" has marked the end of that task. Such kinds of final examinations - often also held before the commanders of police and other local dignitaries - were very typical for such courses held by Kasulakow throughout Europe.

    All that may not be very well known in the Česká republika today, as, while the articles appeared in Czech newspapers, it were newspapers in German language, and the German-speaking population and it's history weren't very welcome there, before and after WWI already, but were - without differentiation - even ex-pulsed from the country after the Nazi-dictatorship and WWII.

    BTW, noboru, the name of one of my grandparents was Vlk. Wink


    Last edited by Reinberger on Thu Mar 10, 2016 10:12 am; edited 3 times in total (Reason for editing : orthography)


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    noboru

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    czech roots

    Post by noboru on Thu Mar 10, 2016 6:13 am

    Reinberger wrote:
    All that may not be very well known in the Česká republika today, as, while the articles appeared in Czech newspapers, it were newspapers in German language, and the German-speaking population and it's history weren't very welcome there, before and after WWI already, but were - without differentiation - even ex-pulsed from the country after the Nazi-dictatorship and WWII.
    Exactly, you have right. Bad times for Austrians, Czechs people and after WWII for German people in Czechoslovakia too. More sufferings, irreparable damages caused by all sides.

    Reinberger wrote:
    BTW, noboru, the name of one of my grandparents was Vlk. Wink
    :-) the word Vlk is czech word, it means Wolf (der Wolf). It looks like that you have czech roots (may be Sudeten roots). From Pilsen? I am from Budweis It was city with german majority (80%) before WW2.
    In the Wien is lot of czech surnames - If I watch to ORF television I see teh czech names often. In times of Austrian-Hungarian monarchy it was capital city and more czech people went there for experiencies or work and they remained and lived there. My predecessors too, but they came back ...

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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Reinberger on Thu Mar 10, 2016 9:18 am

    noboru wrote:
    Reinberger wrote:
    BTW, noboru, the name of one of my grandparents was Vlk. Wink
    :-) the word Vlk is czech word, it means Wolf (der Wolf). It looks like that you have czech roots (may be Sudeten roots). From Pilsen? I am from Budweis It was city with german majority (80%) before WW2.
    In the Wien is lot of czech surnames -  If I watch to ORF television I see teh czech names often. In times of Austrian-Hungarian monarchy it was capital city and more czech people went there for experiencies or work and they remained and lived there. My predecessors too, but they came back ...

    Correct. Of course I knew what "Vlk" means, as my grandfather, born in Vienna in 1898, had already explained it to me, when I was a little boy. He was the son of Johann Vlk, born in Kurein (I've no idea, where exactly that was/is, or how it is or was called in your language), Moravia in 1866, son of Marianna, née Vlk,
    and
    Maria Vlk, née Moravec, born 1864 in Vepříkov, parish Příbram, in Bohemia, daughter of Josef Moravec and Maria Moravec, née Pešek.

    I looked at the map, and can't understand, how Vepříkov could have belonged to the parish of Příbram, but that's what is stated in an old document from my grandpa (his certificate of baptism, the sole forerunner of birth certificates in Austria).

    Currently, I'm a little bit in your country from time to time, when we are shopping in Chvalovice-Hatě, or, to be more exact, in Excalibur City. In 2014, together with my family, I went to Břeclav with a steam-powered train, to visit the exposition of "175 years railway in Czechia". That are some short years more, than the history of Jūjutsu/Jūdō there, but both share their history of a "connection" with Austria(-Hungary). Very Happy The very first (horse-drawn) public railway in continental Europe was a line, connecting your town with an Austrian town: the Railway České Budějovice - Linz.


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    noboru

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    information about Mr.Sumakov, Kasulakov

    Post by noboru on Thu Mar 10, 2016 6:14 pm

    I found any next informations about Mr.Sumakov, Kasulakov etc.

    About Sumakov:
    It is from Croatian judo/jiujisu history.
    http://www.zagreb-judo.hr/wp-content/uploads/judo-magazin_03_2011_web.pdf
    Page 27, 28 is text about Sumakow and scans of pages his book
    Među prvim osobama koji su podučavali na našem prostoru bio je Ukrajinac Aleksandar Sumakov, jedan od značajnih učitelja „jiu-jitse”, koji je vježbao pripadnike redarstvenih službi u Hrvatskoj za vrijeme Austro-Ugarske. Aleksandar Sumakov je održao tečaj jiu-jitse u Splitu 1914. godine za redare i članove Hrvatskog Sokola.

    Nakon njega zabilježeno je da je u Zagrebu jiu-jitsu počeo podučavati Nijemac Ralph Hocke, inače atletski trener zagrebačkog HAŠKa. On je 1920. godine osnovao Zagrebačku školu jiu-jitsua. Uz niz javnih nastupa Hocke je 1924. godine napisao i udžbenik samoobrane pod naslovom „Điu-đicu”.

    Od 1939. pa do 1941. godine u Zagrebu je živio i radio Oto Baumgarten, rođen 4. lipnja 1913. u Trbovlju, Slovenija. On je bio poznavatelj jiu-jitse, osnovao je sekciju u Sokolskom društvu, a od 1939. godine, živio je u Zagrebu. Na žalost, tijekom 2. svjetskog rata stradava u koncentracijskom logoru zbog svog židovskog podrijetla.


    Google translations from Croatian to English

    Among the first people who are taught to our room was a Ukrainian Alexander Shumakov, one of the major teachers "jiu-jitsu", who is practicing members of the police services in Croatia during the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Alexander Shumakov held a course jiu-jitsu in Split in 1914 for security guards and members of the Croatian Falcon.

    After it was noted that in Zagreb jiu-jitsu started teaching German Ralph Hocke, or athletic trainer Zagreb Haske. It was founded in 1920, Zagreb School of jiu-jitsu. With a series of public appearances Hock in 1924 and wrote a textbook self-defense under the heading "Jiu-Jitsu".

    From 1939 until 1941 in Zagreb, he lived and worked Otto Baumgarten, born June 4, 1913 in Trbovlje, Slovenia. He was an expert in jiu-jitsu, he founded the section in Sokol society, and since 1939, he lived in Zagreb. Unfortunately, during the 2nd World War II suffers in a concentration camp because of his Jewish origin.

    -------------------------------------
    About Kasulakow:

    Dutch judo history
    http://www.judo-snijders.nl/engels/historie-dutch-judo.html
    With the arrival of Y. Tani (1899) in London, judo and jiu-jitsu reached the European continent. Around 1910 P.M.C. Toepoel started as a first in The Hague with lessons in jiu-jitsu, followed by Mark van der Sluis, W. Kasulakoff, M. van Nieuwenhuizen and Tops gave P.M.C. Toepoel. In Amsterdam Boretius gave jiu-jitsu-lessons and in 1938, J. v.d. Bruggen opened in Rotterdam the first jiu-jitsu - and the judo school.

    French newspaper LEXPRES DU MIDI (de edition Toulouse) from 17.January 1924 / page 3
    http://images.expressdumidi.bibliotheque.toulouse.fr/1924/B315556101_EXPRESS_1924_01_17.pdf

    Les Agents de Police apprennent le jiu-jitsu
    Les agents de police terrasseront désormais, sans aucune brutalité et « avec élégance >, les malfaiteurs qui refuseraient de les suivre au, violon ou qui manifestei'a.ient à leur égard des inteuuaos hostiles. Ils vont recevoir, en effet, les précieuses leçons du professeur Wladimir Kasulakov, champion du monde. M. Kasulakov nous a fait, mardi soir, à la salle des mariages, urne démonstration de sa méthode perfectionnée. Son procédé, a-t-ii expliqué, n'a. rien de commun avec le jiu-jitsu japonais toujours dangereux. Laissant de côté les moyens de défense de la race jaune, M. Kasulakov veille surtout à « nerien casser » et à conserver à ses mouvements ie caractère d'élégance et de douceur qui mettront désormais les policiers à l'abri des critiques de la foule. Ce nouveau système, basé sui la pure anatomie, a pour but de réduire à l'impuissance le plus dangereux des malfaiteurs sans causer d'autre torture qu'une douleur passagère. Le principe fondamental réside dans ce proverbe d'ExtTême-Orient qui dit: « Si tu me pousses, je te tue, si tu nie tue, je te pousse ». En d'autres termes, la technique du jiu-jitsu moderne veut qu'on complète les efforts de l'adversaire pour vaincre l'adversaire lui même Et, de fait, le professeur réussit pleinement. Ses démonstrations ont d'ailleurs mis en lumière les importantes qualités de sa méthode et ses avantages incontestables.
    M. Kasulakov, qui a parcouru les principales villes de France, va demeurer quelque temps à Toulouse pour faire l'éducation de nos agents de police. Lorsque ceux-ci seront complètement instruits et familiarisés avec les « tours » du jiu-jitsu, la police toulousalrue sera dotée d'une nouvelle arme contre les malfaiteurs dangereux qui n'auront qu'à se bien tenir.
    Et nous n'entendrons plus dans la rue les quolibets de ce public des faits divers qui prend toujours la défense de Polichinelle lorsqu'il frappe sur le gendarme et ne manque s de qualifier un peu durement les représentants de l'autorité chaque fols qu'ils esquissent via geste un peu brutal, souvent nécessité par i'attituidie des délinquants. — E.C


    Google translation from french to english

    The Police Officers learn Jujitsu
    Police officers now terrasseront without any brutality and "elegantly>, the criminals who refuse to follow the violin or manifestei'a.ient to them hostile inteuuaos. They will receive, in effect, the valuable lessons of Professor Wladimir Kasulakov world champion. Mr. Kasulakov made us Tuesday night at the marriage hall, urn demonstrated his improved method. His method did ii explained, did. nothing in common with the Japanese jujitsu always dangerous. Leaving aside the defense of the yellow race, especially Mr. Kasulakov ensures "nerien break" and keep his movements ie character elegance and softness that now the police will immune to criticism from the crowd . The new system, based sui pure anatomy, aims to reduce to impotence the most dangerous criminals without causing other torture a passing pain. The basic principle is this proverb ExtTême East who said: "If you shoot me, I'll kill you if you deny killing, I push you." In other words, the technique of modern jujitsu wants us to complete the opponent's efforts to defeat the opponent himself And indeed, Professor fully succeeds. His demonstrations have also highlighted the important qualities of his method and its undeniable advantages.
    Mr. Kasulakov who traveled through the main cities of France, will remain for some time in Toulouse to the education of our police officers. When they will be fully trained and familiar with the "towers" of jiu-jitsu, the toulousalrue Police will have a new weapon against dangerous criminals who need only to hold good.
    And we no longer hear the jeers in the streets of this public news items that always defends Pulcinella strikes when the policeman and lacks s a little hard to qualify the authority figures each fools that they sketch via gesture a bit brutal, often by necessity i'attituidie offenders. - E.C.

    Reinberger

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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Reinberger on Fri Mar 11, 2016 4:48 am

    noboru,

    Alexander Sumakow also taught in Znaim (Znojmo). This happened in 1913. The matter is interesting, because there are more details available than usual, about this incidents. BTW, some times his name was written "Sumakoff" in that case.

    At first, the holding of a "Dschiu-Dschitsu-course" by Sumakow for the municipal security guards, lasting for 8-10 days was decided, as well as a honorarium of 300 korunas for the teacher, "if the public, final examination results in satisfaction".

    Then Sumakow, during the course for the police, one evening also held a public demonstration at the municipal school for boys. As enough participants registered, an additional, ten-day private course was organized.

    The aforementioned final examination seems to have been successful, as the municipal committee of Znojmo subsequently  approved the request No. 3399 for payment of the 300 kronas. They had to be booked to code XII of the municipal estimates. Surprised


    Last edited by Reinberger on Fri Mar 11, 2016 5:19 am; edited 1 time in total


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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by finarashi on Fri Mar 11, 2016 5:19 am

    Does anybody know if these Russians were of the same Chinese school that was under Kano's tuteladge and where e.g. Vasili Oshchepkov learnt Judo.
    I'm just guessing that if there was one Russian then there were more.
    Another possibility is that these were "self made" jiu-jitsu teachers as very few did learn the true art. But by buying the book and studying the moves you were better than anybody for 10 day course.


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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by NBK on Fri Mar 11, 2016 12:22 pm

    finarashi wrote:Does anybody know if these Russians were of the same Chinese school that was under Kano's tuteladge and where e.g. Vasili Oshchepkov learnt Judo.
    I'm just guessing that if there was one Russian then there were more.
    Another possibility is that these were "self made" jiu-jitsu teachers as very few did learn the true art. But by buying the book and studying the moves you were better than anybody for 10 day course.
    Are you asking if Russians studied at the Kobun Gakuin, the school Kano shihan set up to teach Chinese students?

    Not to my knowledge.

    There were foreigners, including Chinese, that attended the Tokyo Higher Normal School, but the school and the curriculum at the Kobun Gakuin was specialized for the Chinese sent by their government.

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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Reinberger on Fri Mar 11, 2016 9:03 pm

    finarashi wrote:Does anybody know if these Russians were of the same Chinese school that was under Kano's tuteladge and where e.g. Vasili Oshchepkov learnt Judo.
    I'm just guessing that if there was one Russian then there were more.
    Another possibility is that these were "self made" jiu-jitsu teachers as very few did learn the true art. But by buying the book and studying the moves you were better than anybody for 10 day course.

    finarashi,

    yes, it would be very interesting (but also difficult, I guess) to find out the technical background and origins of those people. Were they legit?

    But, whatever the case and regardless of their quality, even characters like the ones you alluded to, as well as ten-days-course participants (BTW, I even found mentions of police-courses as short as two days! Perhaps the financial possibilities of the communities in question also played a certain role), and even the people that later tried to learn the art via correspondence courses - they all were phenomena that existed, and therefore have their place in the history of the arts, I think. What I also think, is, that Jūjutsu and Jūdō aren't arts that only are practised by "great grand masters" of flawless origins, histories, knowledge and skills, and weren't such, (not only, but) especially outside Japan, and (not only, but) particularly during those initial phases, were they?


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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by finarashi on Sat Mar 12, 2016 1:07 am


    finarashi,

    yes, it would be very interesting (but also difficult, I guess) to find out the technical background and origins of those people. Were they legit?

    But, whatever the case and regardless of their quality, even characters like the ones you alluded to, as well as ten-days-course participants (BTW, I even found mentions of police-courses as short as two days! Perhaps the financial possibilities of the communities in question also played a certain role), and even the people that later tried to learn the art via correspondence courses - they all were phenomena that existed, and therefore have their place in the history of the arts, I think. What I also think, is, that Jūjutsu and Jūdō aren't arts that only are practised by "great grand masters" of flawless origins, histories, knowledge and skills, and weren't such, (not only, but) especially outside Japan, and (not only, but) particularly during those initial phases, were they?
    I quite agree. The famous father of Scandinavian jiu-jitsu Viking Cronholm AFAIK never seriously studied jiu-jitsu nor judo. His claims of teachings can not be verified.
    When he left South Africa he has no verified background. I have a book signed by him IMHO on his way back to Sweden (if I remember right in Marseille). When he arrives in Sweden he is a jiu-jitsu expert. Expertize is verified by publishing a book (with number of reprints) and holding courses.
    The book is "Judo Kyohan".



    I have also a book of a Finnish jiu-jitsu expert. The book was first published as series of booklets and could be mail ordered in parts. He has no record of ever doing jiu-jitsu. As sportsman he did sports and also was part of Circus and gained fame as one of the flying gymnasts (i.e. doing gymnastics at a wing of a flying airplane at airshows). He comes back from US and starts publishing jiu-jitsu. In his case we can find the book he copied from Smile

    The books by Hancock started circulating around 1905, so after that it was easy to be jiu-jitsu expert.

    But a bad teacher is better than no teacher at all.

    And if you do teaching you are bound to become better


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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Reinberger on Sat Mar 12, 2016 3:35 am

    finarashi wrote: ... The books by Hancock started circulating around 1905, so after that it was easy to be jiu-jitsu expert. ...

    The first illustrated text about Jiu-Jitsu by Hancock, I've found so far, is from January 1901. I think the first edition of Spalding's Jiu-Jitsu book with "Poses by A. Minami and K. Koyama" may have been issued the same year. Hancock published his "Japanese physical training" as early as 1903, his "Physical training for Women by Japanese Methods", "Physical Training for Children by Japanese Methods" and "Jiu-Jitsu combat tricks" followed in 1904, the same year, when Capt. Harry H. Skinner released his "Jiu-Jitsu" with Kuwashima demonstrating, and Yae Kichi Yabe his five-part instruction course "The Yabe School of Jiu-Jitsu". Additionally, a huge number of - partially also illustrated - articles had appeared in all kinds of languages, newspapers and magazines, during that years.

    I guess that he, who had to wait until 1905, and for Hancock's notorious "The Complete Kano Jiu-Jitsu (Jiudo)", issued then, may even have been a little bit late already, to eventually become a "Jiu-Jitsu-expert". Very Happy


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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by finarashi on Sun Mar 13, 2016 1:46 am

    Reinberger wrote:

    The first illustrated text about Jiu-Jitsu by Hancock, I've found so far, is from January 1901. I think the first edition of Spalding's Jiu-Jitsu book with "Poses by A. Minami and K. Koyama" may have been issued the same year. Hancock published his "Japanese physical training" as early as 1903, his "Physical training for Women by Japanese Methods", "Physical Training for Children by Japanese Methods" and "Jiu-Jitsu combat tricks" followed in 1904, the same year, when Capt. Harry H. Skinner released his "Jiu-Jitsu" with Kuwashima demonstrating, and Yae Kichi Yabe his five-part instruction course "The Yabe School of Jiu-Jitsu". Additionally, a huge number of - partially also illustrated - articles had appeared in all kinds of languages, newspapers and magazines, during that years.

    I guess that he, who had to wait until 1905, and for Hancock's notorious "The Complete Kano Jiu-Jitsu (Jiudo)", issued then, may even have been a little bit late already, to eventually become a "Jiu-Jitsu-expert". Very Happy

    I meant his books starting to circulate in Europe after being translated to French, German, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, ...

    IMHO all the way into WWII in Europe one had little to judge whether somebody knew any jiu-jitsu or not. In some countries this was even longer at least into 19070's.

    Coups de combat du jiu-jitsu, procédes d'attaque et de défense pour le combat individuel, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Paris, France, Berger-Levrault, 1909, 167p
    Das Kano jiu-jitsu (Jiudo) : das offizielle Jiu-Jitsu der japanischen Regierung : mit Ergänzungen von Hoshino und Tsutsumi, sowie Erläuterungen über gefährliche Schläge und das Kuatsu, das japanische Verfahren zur Wiederbelebung Bewustloser, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, Stuttgart, Germany, Julius Hoffmann, 1906 1910, 526p
    Dschiu-dschitsu : Die quelle japanischer kraft : methodische Körperstählung und athletische Kunstgriffe der Japaner, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Danwik, Mar, Stuttgart, Germany, Julius Hoffmann, 1905, 235p
    Dshiu-Dshitsu : ikivanha, päälle 2,500 vuotinen japanilainen järjestelmä : Osa I Japanilainen ruumiin kasvatus : harjoitus- ja ravintojärjestelmä sekä yleinen elantotapa, jotka yhteisesti ovat tehneet Mikadon kansan miehet ja naiset terveimmiksi, voimakkaimmiksi ja onnellisimmiksi maailmassa, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Roine, Reinhold, Helsinki, Finland, Lindstedt'in Antikvaarinen Kirjakauppa, 1905, 144p
    Dshiu-Dshitsu : ikivanha, päälle 2,500 vuotinen japanilainen järjestelmä : Osa I Japanilainen ruumiin kasvatus : harjoitus- ja ravintojärjestelmä sekä yleinen elantotapa, jotka yhteisesti ovat tehneet Mikadon kansan miehet ja naiset terveimmiksi, voimakkaimmiksi ja onnellisimmiksi maailmassa : Osa II Dshiu-Dshitsu-taistelu-temppuja : japanilaisia hyökkäys- ja puolustustapoja kaksintaistelussa, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Roine, Reinhold, Helsinki, Finland, Lindstedt'in Antikvaarinen Kirjakauppa, 1905, 272p
    Dshiu-Dshitsu : ikivanha, päälle 2,500 vuotinen japanilainen ruumiinkasvatus ja harjoitusjärjestelmä : Osa II Dshiu-Dshitsu-taistelu-temppuja : japanilaisia hyökkäys- ja puolustustapoja kaksintaistelussa, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Roine, Reinhold, Helsinki, Finland, Lindstedt'in Antikvaarinen Kirjakauppa, 1905, 128p
    Dzhiu-dzhitsu : Sistema fizicheskago razvitiya i atletiki u Yapontsev, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), A. G., Sankt-Peterburg, Russia, Izdanie A. N. Zaridnago, 1908, 188p
    Dzhiu-dzhitsu : Sistema fizicheskogo razvitiya i atletiki u yapontsev, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), A. G., Moscow, Russia, URSS, 2013, 188p
    Dżiu-dżicu czyli źródło zdrowia, siły i zręczności, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Kłośnik, Zygmunt ; Maniszewski, J., Lwów, Poland, 1909,
    Dżiu-dżicu czyli źródło zdrowia, siły i zręczności, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Kłośnik, Zygmunt ; „Globus”, Warszawa, Poland, 1920,
    Dżiu-dżitsu, czyli źródło zdrowia, siły i zręczności, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Kłośnik, Zygmunt, Lwów, Poland, 1907,
    Fizyczne wychowanie w Japonji Dżiu-itsu, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Modzelewski, J., Warszawa, Poland, 1906,
    Japanese physical training : the system of exercise, diet, and general mode of living that has made the Mikado's people the healthiest, strongest, and happiest men and women in the world, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), New York, United States, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1903 1904[2] 1905[8], xv,156p
    Japanische Gymnastik für Knaben und Mädchen nach dem Jiu-Jitsu-System, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Stuttgart, Germany, Julius Hoffmann, 1906 1925, 127p
    Japoński system fizycznego trenowania ciała dla kobiet, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Szukiewicz, W. ; Arct, M., Warszawa, Poland, 1906,
    Japoński system fizycznego trenowania ciała dla młodzieży, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Szukiewicz, W. ; Arct, M., Warszawa, Poland, 1908,
    Japoński system trenowania ciała, czyli system ćwiczeń, dietetyki i ogólny sposób życia, który uczynił lud Maikada najzdrowszym, najmocniejszym i najszczęśliwszym na ziemi, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Szukiewicz, W. ; Arct, M., Warszawa, Poland, 1906,
    Jigoro Kano : o l'origine del judo, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, Milano, Italy, Luni, 2005, 278p
    Jiu-jitsu : Educação Physica Japoneza : O systema de excericios, alimentação e modo gereal de vida, que fez do povo da Mikado os mais sadios, os mais fortes e mais felizes homenes e mulheres do mundo, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma; Porto, Santos; Radler de Aquino, Francisco, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Companhia Typografica do Brazil, 1905, 157p
    Jiu-jitsu : Méthode d'entrainment et de combat qui a fait des Japonais les adversaires les plus redoutables du monde, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Ferrus L. ; Pesseaud, J., Paris, France, Berger-Levrault, 1905 1916 1929, 172p
    Jiu-jitsu : Méthode Japonais, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Ferrus L. ; Pesseaud, J., Paris, France, Berger-Levrault, 1929 1934, 172p
    Jiu-jitsu : Tratado pratico de preparacáo e de combate, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, Lisboa, Portugal, Lusitana editora, 1908,
    Jiu-jitsu Combat Tricks : Japanese Feats of Attack and Defence in Personal Encounter, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), New York, United States, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904, 151p
    Jiu-jitsu Combat Tricks : Japanese Feats of Attack and Defence in Personal Encounter, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), New York, United States, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1924, 151p
    Jiu-jitsu Combat Tricks : Japanese Feats of Attack and Defence in Personal Encounter, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), New York, United States, Kessinger Publishing', 2009, 204p
    Kvinnans fysiska träning, enligt japansk metod, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Stockholm, Sweden, Puritasförlag, 1905, 160p
    Le Jiu-jitsu et la femme : entraînement physique féminin, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Paris, France, Berger-Levrault, 1906, 166p
    Le Jiu-jitsu et la femme : entraînement physique féminin, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Ferrus, Leonce Aime ; Pesseaud, Joseph, New York, United states, Kessinger Publishing, 2010, 278p
    Les coups de combat de Jiu-jitsu, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Paris, France, Berger-Levrault, 1909, 167p
    Physical Training for Children by Japanese Methods : A Manual for use in Schools and at Home, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), New York & London, United States, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904, 153p
    Physical Training for Children by Japanese Methods : A Manual for use in Schools and at Home, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Delhi, India, Pranava Books, 2009, 244p
    Physical Training for Women by Japanese Methods, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), New York & London, United States, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904 1905, 152p
    Physical Training for Women by Japanese Methods, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Delhi, India, Pranava Books, 2009, 246p
    The Complete Kano Jiu-Jitsu - Jiudo - The Official Jiu-Jitsu Of The Japanese Government - With Additions By Hoshino And Tsutsumi And Chapters On The Serious And Fatal Blows And On Kuatsu The Japanese Science Of The Restoration Of Life, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, UL, United Kingdom, Read Books, 2009, 544p
    The complete Kano Jiu-Jitsu (Judo), Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, Mineola, NY, United States, Dover Publications, 2006, 526p
    The complete Kano Jiu-Jitsu (Judo), Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, New York, United States, Dover Publications, 1950 1961 1980, 500p
    The complete Kano Jiu-Jitsu (Judo), Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, New York, United States, G. P. Putnam & Sons, 1905, 526p
    The complete Kano jiu-jitsu (Judo), Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, London, United Kingdom, Constable, 1961, 500p
    The complete Kano jiu-jitsu, judo : the official jiu-jitsu of the Japanese government, with the additions of Hoshino and Tsutsumi, and chapters on the serious and fatal blows and on Kuatsu the Japanese science of the restoration of life, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, London, United Kingdom, G. P. Putnam & Sons, 1924[1] 1927[2] 1931[4] 1935[4], 526p
    The complete Kano jiu-jitsu, judo : the official jiu-jitsu of the Japanese government, with the additions of Hoshino and Tsutsumi, and chapters on the serious and fatal blows and on Kuatsu the Japanese science of the restoration of life, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, London, United Kingdom, G. P. Putnam & Sons, 1938[5], 526p
    Traité complet de Jiu-Jitsu, méthode Kano : Jiu-Jitsu officiel du gouvernement japonais, coups dangereux ou mortels, Kuatsu ou science du rappel à la vie, Hancock, Harrie Irving (1868 - 1922), Higashi, Katsukuma, Paris, France, Berger-Levrault, 1908, 527p


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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Reinberger on Thu Apr 07, 2016 2:59 am

    On October 2nd, 1926, "Prager Tagblatt" reported:



    "Deutscher Turnverein in Prag (German gymnastics club in Prague). J i u - J i t s u - C o u r s e s. There is an opportunity to learn this reliable technique of self-defence in short courses. The lessons are given by a proven and graduated employee. It's possible to hold courses for ladies and gentlemen. All informations in the office, daily 5-8."


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    noboru

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    japanese consul in Prague Kozo Itigé /Kozo Ichige and czech judokas 1945

    Post by noboru on Mon Apr 18, 2016 10:37 pm

    Here is photo from jiujitsu/judo championships from year 1945 (may be 1940). There are judokas Cigner, Zrubek, Tuma, head of Czech jiujitsu union Mr. Frantisek Smotlacha with japanese consul in Prague Kozo Itigé /Kozo Ichige (1894–1945)



    Kozo Itigé /Kozo Ichige
    Throughout the 1930s Ichige Kozo , the Japanese consul in São Paulo and haiku poet (haigo Gyosetsu), was active in promoting haiku among the Japanese population in Brazil, notably in the haiku study group led by Kimura Keiseki (1867–1938) in São Paulo.
    Source:
    http://haikudomedellin.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/100-bridges.pdf

    News papers of Sao Paolo, year 1939 - foto and article about Kozo Itige
    http://memoria.bn.br/DocReader/Hotpage/HotpageBN.aspx?bib=090972_08&pagfis=18096&pesq=&url=http://memoria.bn.br/docreader#

    noboru

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    T.P.Leggett and his photos from teaching in Czechoslovakia - October 1937

    Post by noboru on Mon Apr 18, 2016 10:39 pm

    Here are some photos of T.P.Leggett. They are from perslonal archive of Mr. Václav Bauer 6.Dan. was member of judo national team Czechoslovakia, a coach assistent of judo national team, coach of junior judo national team Czechoslovakia,coach of judo club Škoda Plzeň.

    Photo with his signature


    Photo with jiujitsu members of club AC Plzeň from Czechoslovakia, year October 1937. (Plzeň is city in west Czech Republic - in outside could be known as Pilsen - Pilsner Urquel beer).


    From the same event

    Reinberger

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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Reinberger on Tue Apr 19, 2016 9:05 pm

    Prague (Praha) again: Prager Tagblatt from September 12th, 1931:


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    Reinberger

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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

    Post by Reinberger on Thu May 05, 2016 2:32 am

    On August, 19th, 1935, the Viennese "Sport-Tagblatt" reported about tournaments between wrestlers from Czechoslovakia and Japan:


    "News from Czechoslovakia. Some days ago, Japanese wrestlers stayed in Prague, and fought a freestyle fight against the wrestling-team of K. A. K. Kral. Vinohrady. The Praguers won with 5:0 points. Then a Dschiudschitsu-Match took place; here, the Japanese were victorious with 3:0 points. ...".

    It has to be noted, that in the first part of the 20th century Japan tried to gain a foothold in the western wrestling-sport by, among other things, retraining suitable jūdōka.


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    noboru

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    summer 1935 - japanese judokas visited Prague

    Post by noboru on Thu May 05, 2016 7:22 am

    Hello Reinberger, thank you a lot again.

    In this time were japanese judokas Ichiro Hatta, Kenji Sugiyama and Ms. Sarah Mayer in Prague. They lead some judo trainings with czech judokas and some matches (end of July in Radiopalac).
    I think that Ichiro Hatta, Kenji Sugiyama were in the european judo tour (Japan, Moskau (Sowiet Union), Prague, London - may be some next cities), Sarah Mayer received shodan in this year in Japan and may be he went to home (England) with Hatta and Sugiyama.

    Here are any photo:


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    Re: The early days of Judo in Czechoslovak Republic (and the contribution of the London Budokwai)

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