E-Judo

Judo network and forum


    Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Share
    avatar
    NBK

    Posts : 1097
    Join date : 2013-01-10
    Location : Tokyo, Japan

    Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by NBK on Sun Apr 26, 2015 8:35 pm

    Hi.

    I have this book, and plan to sell it:
    Jiu jitsu en judo [Hardcover]
    Van Nieuwenhuizen Maurice
    1941

    Good shape: faded spine, a couple of loose pages, but everything very clean otherwise.

    I could deliver it to the Kodokan kata course this summer.

    Please PM me. And, as a topic, does anyone know this gent?

    NBK

    johan smits

    Posts : 72
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by johan smits on Tue Apr 28, 2015 1:14 am

    Maurice van Nieuwenhuizen owned a sportsschool in The Hague prior to WW2. He taught physical education, boxing and jiujitsu. He is most famous in The Netherlands for popularizing jiujitsu and later judo.
    He counted a lot of people from 'the elite' among his students and has authored some of the more well known books on jiujitsu and judo in The Netherlands.
    One of this students was Alfred Mazure, an artist, filmmaker and cartoonist. Mazure came up with a very popular comic figure named 'Dick Bos'. Dick Bos was a private investigator and jiujitsu expert. The series became immensely popular. Maurice van Nieuwenhuizen stood as a model for Dick Bos.

    Maurice had a brother; Bob van Nieuwenhuizen who was also a jiujitsu teacher. I think a son of Bob, Steve is still teaching jiujitsu in The Hague.

    Maurice van Nieuwenhuizen was quite a controversial figure but was a prolific writer of early books on jiujitsu and judo and figured preeminently in the early jiujitsu scene in my country.

    Happy landings.
    avatar
    NBK

    Posts : 1097
    Join date : 2013-01-10
    Location : Tokyo, Japan

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by NBK on Tue Apr 28, 2015 10:46 am

    Johan, if you know someone coming to the Kodokan for the summer course I could ask them to take the book to you. It doesn't do me much good, even though it has letters!

    johan smits

    Posts : 72
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by johan smits on Wed Apr 29, 2015 6:58 am

    I will see if I can find someone who might be interested. i got quite a lot of material on Van Nieuwenhuizen.
    Within a couple of weeks a small book on the history of judo in The Netherlands will go to the printer. This will be in Dutch. Later this year I hope to publish something in English on pre-war judo in The Netherlands.

    A couple of years ago in an issue of a magazine named Hiden bujutsu and budo there has been an article published on Sanshin Araki ryu. I am looking for this article for some time now
    Would you happen to know in which issue that was?

    Happy landings.
    avatar
    NBK

    Posts : 1097
    Join date : 2013-01-10
    Location : Tokyo, Japan

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by NBK on Wed Apr 29, 2015 10:28 am

    johan smits wrote:I will see if I can find someone who might be interested. i got quite a lot of material on Van Nieuwenhuizen.
    Within a couple of weeks a small book on the history of judo in The Netherlands will go to the printer. This will be in Dutch. Later this year I hope to publish something in English on pre-war judo in The Netherlands.

    A couple of years ago in an issue of a magazine named Hiden bujutsu and budo there has been an article published on Sanshin Araki ryu. I am looking for this article for some time now
    Would you happen to know in which issue that was?

    Happy landings.
    I think you mean Sanjin Araki ryû.  See http://arakiryu.org/wp/?page_id=25 from my friend and colleague Ellis Amdur.  I helped him research one branch of the school, not this one.  

    No, I wasn't clear.  If you know someone coming, I'll give the book to them for you, if you wish.  Consider it a consolation prize for waiting so long for the Shobu no Kata translation!  If I donate it to the Kôdôkan Library no one will ever read it.  

    You may mean this newsletter - see #100 http://japanbujut.exblog.jp/20285792
    Osano Jun sensei's newsletter.

    johan smits

    Posts : 72
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by johan smits on Thu Apr 30, 2015 12:56 am



    That is very kind of you. I see if I can find someone who will attend.
    You are right it is the sanjin araki ryu torite jutsu (三神荒木流捕手術). In some texts it is names as sanshin araki ryu or mikami araki ryu.
    There has been a mikami ryu, a sword school or sogo bujutsu. I wonder if the sanjin araki ryu comes from that (at least for the sword part, which does not exists anymore.
    Thanks for the link bu I am pretty sure it was the Hiden magazine. It had a photograph of a sitting technique and two photo's of former sensei.

    I had not forgotten the shobu no kata but I think I should not bother people too much and since you are very busy...

    Happy landings.

    DougNZ

    Posts : 399
    Join date : 2013-01-28

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by DougNZ on Tue May 05, 2015 1:05 pm

    Dear Johan

    Please consider me your first customer of the English version. Please PM me when its is available for sale.

    What will the difference between the Dutch and English publications be? Wish I could read Dutch ...

    DougNZ

    johan smits wrote:I will see if I can find someone who might be interested. i got quite a lot of material on Van Nieuwenhuizen.
    Within a couple of weeks a small book on the history of judo in The Netherlands will go to the printer. This will be in Dutch. Later this year I hope to publish something in English on pre-war judo in The Netherlands.

    A couple of years ago in an issue of a magazine named Hiden bujutsu and budo there has been an article published on Sanshin Araki ryu. I am looking for this article for some time now
    Would you happen to know in which issue that was?

    Happy landings.

    johan smits

    Posts : 72
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by johan smits on Tue May 05, 2015 8:10 pm

    Doug thankyou very much for your kind words.


    The book in Dutch will consist mainly of periodicals ( the kind that were made on typewriters so nothing fancy) of shortly after the war.
    I got a lot of material collected in some forty years and that is just no longer available. Not in county- or cityarchives not in the national archive or royal library of my country. Sports organisations the same thing.
    So I reckoned if I publish it it will become available for those interested.

    The pre-war judo book in English is another thing.  This will be much more a technical manual. I found some interesting things in several family archives. I like to think this book will be a more lively publication. I will certainly pm you as soon as it will become available.

    Thanks again and happy landings.

    DougNZ

    Posts : 399
    Join date : 2013-01-28

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by DougNZ on Tue May 05, 2015 9:59 pm

    I am sure that this thread has run its course as much as the OP intended so I am going to unashamedly hijack it! Keeping with the Dutch theme ...

    The man who introduced Kawaishi judo and jiu jitsu to NZ was taught by Jaap Neuwelaerts de Age at the CIOS. Now, I have read your view, Johan, that there is no lasting evidence that the jiu jitsu taught in the Netherlands came from Kawaishi. Considering jiu jitsu only, I have four questions:

    1. Who do you think had the greatest influence, technique-wise, on pre-1960s Dutch jiu-jitsu?
    2. Who do you suppose had the greatest influence on de Age?
    3. In most of the well-known clubs, roughly what percentage of time was spend on jiu jitsu v judo (1945-1960)?
    4. Was jiu jitsu taught throughout the kyu grades or was it introduced at a higher level?

    johan smits

    Posts : 72
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by johan smits on Wed May 06, 2015 12:56 am

    Hi Doug,

    I guess NBK will not mind.

    Kawaishi was one of the great teachers for a lot of the Dutch judo teachers after the war. The influence of the war and especially the occupation has been of considerable influence in the way judo (and jiujitsu) were organized in my country. Although interesting that is another subject.at

    1. Several teachers, Van Nieuwenhuizen, Van der Bruggen, Boretius come to mind. Most of the pre 1960 jiujitsu teachers were taught by either one of these three..

    2. Van Nieuwenhuizen (de Age's original teacher) and probably Van der Bruggen who taught at Van Nieuwenhuizen's sportsschool (where de Age trained).

    3. Difficult to answer. Jiujitsu was in the period you mention reasonably established. Probably from the 1950's onward judo became more prominent and more available. One of the schools I know of almost completely started teaching judo while the hours for jiujitsu became just a few per week.

    4. I know from several schools where judo was taught they started teaching jiujitsu from 5th kyu others from 3rd kyu.


    Happy landings.

    DougNZ

    Posts : 399
    Join date : 2013-01-28

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by DougNZ on Wed May 06, 2015 6:58 am

    Interesting. When I learnt jiu jitsu, it was very much jiu jitsu with judo added on. However, when van Ess sensei was at the CIOS, I got the impression it was judo with jiu jitsu added on. For example, Hans got his shodan in judo and then had to do a further period of study to get his shodan in jiu jitsu.

    In the 1950s, Koning and de Age travelled to Paris and London for tuition. In Paris, I think they were mostly doing judo. You have said that Kawaishi left no visible mark on Dutch jiu jitsu; did Koizumi have any influence, do you think?

    johan smits

    Posts : 72
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by johan smits on Wed May 06, 2015 7:49 am

    Doug I guess for a large part it depended on the teacher you were training under. The early teachers all had experience with jiujitsu. Judo was originally promoted as the sport part of jiujitsu. Later on (not that later on) it became a sport in its own right.
    Most of the early Dutch teachers sought tuition from masters abroad. Koizumi and Kawaishi and their students being the most popular.
    Van der Bruggen got his shodan from Koizumi somewhere in the late forties (1948 from memory). Koizumi remained popular with Ger "opa" Schutte and his NAJA (an amateur association). Kawaishi became more popular with the teachers of the NJJB (an organisation for professional teachers, read owners of sportsschools).

    It would probably be fair to say that the teachers of jiujitsu in Holland got their programs (kersebloesem or cherryflower) for grades by looking very closely to the jiujitsu part of the Kawaishi method.
    In the end Kawaishi's influence was much bigger than Koizumi's at least in Holland.

    Happy landings.

    DougNZ

    Posts : 399
    Join date : 2013-01-28

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by DougNZ on Wed May 06, 2015 8:48 pm

    johan smits wrote:It would probably be fair to say that the teachers of jiujitsu in Holland got their programs (kersebloesem or cherryflower) for grades by looking very closely to the jiujitsu part of the Kawaishi method.

    Can you elaborate, please?

    johan smits

    Posts : 72
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by johan smits on Thu May 07, 2015 9:05 pm

    Jiujitsu reached The Netherlands through a number of independent lines. Each had their own curriculum of techniques, idea's about grading, etc.
    Most of the teachers before and around WW2 used the curriculum by Maurice van Nieuwenhuizen and Van der Bruggen. You can find that in the books by Van Nieuwenhuizen.
    There was not a lot of cooperation between teachers, only a few were working together.
    In general you can say that the art practised was old fashioned jiujitsu with very little or no influence of judo.
    After the war, jiujitsu in Holland changed. A lot of things were taken from judo. Kawaishi was a very big influence on judo in The Netherlands.
    Self defense was a large part of Kawaishi's teachings and was readily available as a substitute for the older forms of jiujitsu.
    The grading system for jiujitsu changed in The Netherlands. From certificates to cerificates for amateurs A,B,C and teacher. The cherrryblossom system (something like 8 grades from white/black with colored cherryblossomhearts sewn to a gi. Later on kyu/dan grades.

    Happy landings.

    DougNZ

    Posts : 399
    Join date : 2013-01-28

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by DougNZ on Thu May 07, 2015 10:26 pm

    johan smits wrote:Self defense was a large part of Kawaishi's teachings and was readily available as a substitute for the older forms of jiujitsu.

    Would you go so far as to say Kawaishi's self defence was more sophisticated than the pre-WWII Dutch jiu jitsu? Was that the attraction for Dutch practitioners of the late 1940s and 50s?

    (My observations of early Western jiu jitsu is that it was generally collections of 'tricks'. Kawaishi, Koizumi and Uyenishi, in contrast, seemed to present something that was more integrated and systemised).

    johan smits

    Posts : 72
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by johan smits on Thu May 07, 2015 11:22 pm

    More sophisticated I would not say. The old jiujitsu was pretty effective but probably there were a lot of misunderstandings about the art and why it was trained in a certain way. The early Dutch teachers were probably not so very knowledgeable about the art. So there was training but not a lot of background for the students. As in why they trained in a certain way and not in a seemingly more realistic way.

    Depending on the teacher, certainly quite a few were probably teaching bags of tricks as you say.

    I feel judo became very popular because of the fact one could hold matches, that is always attractive to people. Judo could also be practised in a much more athletic, more intensive way. The older form of jiujitsu was much more like kata (as in pre-arranged training). The more modern form of jiujitsu (Kawaishi's) would fit in well with the judotraining and could also be trained in a more judo like fashion.



    Happy landings.

    DougNZ

    Posts : 399
    Join date : 2013-01-28

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by DougNZ on Fri May 08, 2015 6:54 am

    Dear Johan

    Thank you for your informative replies.  I am sure I have taken up more than my fair share of your time and I look forward to your book to give a more in-depth history of early Dutch jiu jitsu.

    Regards

    Doug

    johan smits

    Posts : 72
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by johan smits on Fri May 08, 2015 5:53 pm

    Doug,

    Always a pleasure.

    Happy landings.

    Sponsored content

    Re: Jiu Jutsu en Judo - Maurice van Nieuwehuizen

    Post by Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Wed Jun 28, 2017 2:34 pm