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    Jigoró Kanó and Nakayama Hakudó

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    noboru

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    Jigoró Kanó and Nakayama Hakudó

    Post by noboru on Thu Apr 21, 2016 6:09 pm

    Od page 67 in very nice german work about judo from Mr. Wolfgang Dax-Romswinkel is interesting photo from any japanese Marine Academy (??? may be Toyama ???).

    https://i86.servimg.com/u/f86/19/01/83/43/kanoji10.jpg



    In the Jigoro Kano's left side sit famous swordsman Nakayama Hakudó (famous kendóka, Butókukai hanshi rank in kendó / iaidó / jodó, head of on branch kenjutsu Shindo Munen ryu, creator iaidó school Muso Shinden and one from creator Toyama ryu battójutsu).

    Source:
    Grundwissen der Geschichte des Kōdōkan-Jūdō in Japan von Wolfgang Dax-Romswinkel
    http://www.nwjv.de/fileadmin/qualifizierung/dokumente/kodokan_judo.pdf

    noboru

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    Nakayama Hakudo and jodo and judo

    Post by noboru on Thu Apr 21, 2016 7:00 pm

    Here is a link: http://www.robertg.com/martialarts_articles.htm

    Here are more informations about Nakayama Hakudo and jodo and judo too - it is from interview with Takaji Smimizu - sensei of Shinto Muso ryu jojutsu (jojutsu - japanese martial art using a short staff called jō.).

    wrote:Shimizu: Right. But this is how I started going to so many different places as a representative of Jojutsu Masters. When I went to Butokukai, I met Hakudou Nakayama-sensei from Judo. That time was Nakayama style’s gold time. Nakayama-sensei was even better known than Sasaburou Takano-sensei. Nakayama-sensei was also a very enthusiastic to learn Jojutsu so he learned it from the famous assassin Ryougorou Uchida-sensei. He saw my performance and gave a compliment, “Muso Ryu is the best among Jojutsu. It is certainly well done. I am glad to see the real Budo now.”

    Morikawa: Ryougorou Uchida is the father of Ryouhei Uchida-sensei who created Kokuryuukai. I wrote a book about ryouhei Uchida-sensei, so I researched a lot about him! I remember that in their next Samurai house, Jiroukuniomi Hirano was there too, right?

    Shimizu: Exactly, The Jirou Hirano’s father was the greatest Jojutsu fighter. Everyone followed by the father and learned Jojutsu. Therefore, Nakayama-sensei was also very interested in Jojutsu. He was astonished by my performance, and then he introduced me to Harugorou Kanou-sensei (Jigoro Kano sensei).

    Morikawa: What is the connection between Jojutsu and Judo?

    Page 216

    Shimizu: I thought there is no connection between Jojutsu and Judo. However, Nakayama-sensei saw me performing and he said he wants to take some Jojutsu elements into Judo. Judo is in a way useless unless you don’t touch the opponents’ body. If the opponent has a knives or swords, you need to make them drop the weapon first in order to make Judo work. So Nakayama-sensei thought if he combined Judo and Jojutsu it would be a greatest self-defense technique. I was very impressed by this idea.

    Morikawa: That sounds make sense. If you consider the real situation for the self protection, there is a necessity to combine two of them. So what did you say to him?

    Shimizu: I felt honored and promised him that I will help him as much as I can. However, Nakamura-sensei was already very old at that time, and he could not join our work. Instead, he told everyone all over Fukuoka who has Yodan or above in Judo to enter Jojutsu dojo.

    wdax

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    Re: Jigoró Kanó and Nakayama Hakudó

    Post by wdax on Thu Apr 21, 2016 7:18 pm

    Very interesting. I think, it´s the same Shimzu, who later taught Bojutsu at the Kodokan. I´m sure NBK can add a little bit more to it.

    noboru

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    Shimizu Takaji

    Post by noboru on Thu Apr 21, 2016 8:20 pm

    Yes he is the same person.


    Young Shimizu Takaji Sensei holding a Kusarigama (down on most left from our view). Jigoro Kano is seated third from right along with other koryu jujutsu teachers that were making the shift from jujutsu to judo.




    From:
    http://www.chingchic.com/articles-from-judo-illustrated-the-kusarigama-the-tsuba-the-lowly-sitting-position-kenjutsu-jodo.html

    NBK

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    Re: Jigoró Kanó and Nakayama Hakudó

    Post by NBK on Tue Apr 26, 2016 6:55 pm

    noboru wrote:Od page 67 in very nice german work about judo from Mr. Wolfgang Dax-Romswinkel is interesting photo from any japanese Marine Academy (??? may be Toyama ???).

    https://i86.servimg.com/u/f86/19/01/83/43/kanoji10.jpg



    In the Jigoro Kano's left side sit famous swordsman Nakayama Hakudó (famous kendóka, Butókukai hanshi rank in kendó / iaidó / jodó, head of on branch kenjutsu Shindo Munen ryu, creator iaidó school Muso Shinden and one from creator Toyama ryu battójutsu).

    Source:
    Grundwissen der Geschichte des Kōdōkan-Jūdō in Japan von Wolfgang Dax-Romswinkel
    http://www.nwjv.de/fileadmin/qualifizierung/dokumente/kodokan_judo.pdf
    Nice find, thanks!  I wish I could figure out who everyone might be.

    The date is probably later than 1930, which the subtitle assumes.  The bespectacled gent between Nagaoka sensei and Kanô shihan looks like Vice Admiral Matsushita Hajime who headed up the Etajima Naval Academy from 1931-1933.  He retired in 1937.  

    Kanô shihan and the Kodokan had very strong ties to the Imperial Japanese Navy.  

    From Dieter Born's collection.  I wish there was more available.


    Last edited by NBK on Tue Apr 26, 2016 7:23 pm; edited 1 time in total

    NBK

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    Re: Jigoró Kanó and Nakayama Hakudó

    Post by NBK on Tue Apr 26, 2016 7:22 pm

    History has mostly forgotten Admiral Matsushita, but in 1932 he proposed the following creed, which is still recited daily by the cadets at the Japanese Navy School at Etajima. Kanô shihan would love this stuff, so I wouldn't doubt that somehow this is related, and he wrote about it. I can't find it quickly, but it's probably someplace.

    The Five Reflections

    Origin:
    The five reflections, or “Gosei” in Japanese, were given to the Imperial Japanese Naval Academy at Etajima in 1932 by Rear Admiral Matsushita, then superintendent of the school. The five reflections are often borrowed by organizations that teach and practice Budo because of their applicability to the practice of martial arts and to spiritual and physical refinement/endeavor.
    Japanese Translation:

    Hitotsu, shisei ni motoru, nakarishika (Have I compromised my sincerity?)

    Hitotsu, genkou ni hazuru, nakarishika (Have I spoken or acted shamefully?)

    Hitotsu, kiryoku ni kakuru, nakarishika (Have I been lacking in spiritual vigor?)

    Hitotsu, doryoku ni urami, nakarishika (Must I regret the level of my effort?)

    Hitotsu, bushou ni wataru, nakarishika (Have I lapsed into laziness?)

    Explanation:
    Each of the reflections begins with the word “One.” In Japanese, mottos and proclamations follow this form, rather than listing elements “one, two, three,…” The significance of this point is to understand that all of these precepts are equally important. None are subordinated to another.

    Each reflection ends with the expression, “nakarishika,” a classical Japanese expression meaning “have I not?,” which is close in flavor to the English, “hast thou not?”

    Shisei ni motoru - Compromised sincerity
    Have there been times when I thought, “I must do such and such,” but allowed the feeling of responsibility pass without following through?

    Genkou ni hazuru - Shame of words and actions
    Am I guilty of making statements that are inconsistent with my actions?
    Do I practice what I preach? Have I reneged on verbal commitments?

    Kiryoku ni kakuru – Lacking Spiritual Vigor
    Has my spiritual strength been adequate? Have I treated any of my endeavors as being of less than primary importance?

    Doryoku ni urami – Regret effort level
    Have I tried hard enough? Are there cases in which I have decided ahead of time that I cannot be successful, and hence not applied myself and given up?

    Bushou ni wataru – Lapse into laziness
    Have I given 100% effort until the very end in all my endeavors? Have I decided “what I have done so far is good enough,” and left important things un-addressed?

    Use of the Five Reflections in One's Practice:
    At the completion of mokusou at the end of practice, one will recite the Gosei in Japanese. As one recites the reflections, one should think about one's practice that day, and think about whether one can sincerely answer no to each of the questions the reflections address.

    Mokuso (黙想, mokusō?) is a Japanese term for meditation, especially when practiced in the traditional Japanese martial arts. Mokuso (pronounced "moh-kso") is performed before beginning a training session in order to "clear one's mind", very similar to the zen concept of mushin. This term is more formally known to mean, "Warming up the mind for training hard."
    http://justamarine.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-five-reflections-origin.html

    NBK

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    Re: Jigoró Kanó and Nakayama Hakudó

    Post by NBK on Wed Apr 27, 2016 12:03 pm

    wdax wrote:Very interesting. I think, it´s the same Shimzu, who later taught Bojutsu at the Kodokan. I´m sure NBK can add a little bit more to it.
    I've written quite a bit about this in the old forum and some other MA fora.

    Kanô shihan was a great fan of what he called 'bôjutsu', but we would call jôjutsu. He wrote a glowing forward to a multi-part series in Judo magazine on jôjutsu, saying that he wanted judo instructors to learn it and promulgate it around the world. I translated that intro someplace, I'm sure it can be found with a quick Google search.

    Shimizu sensei taught several of my jôjutsu instructors, but only taught briefly at the Kodokan it seems. Their primary instructor was a gent name Hioki, we think, but the name is unusual and could be pronounced a couple of ways.

    There is a thread in this forum
    http://judo.forumsmotion.com/t1984-judo-and-jodo-jojutsu-kenjutsu-studying-for-yudansha

    Jôdô seems to me to be a terrible waste - years ago they emasculated what was apparently once a hugely practical and powerful martial art. It is now mostly pointless posturing and endless polishing of nothing. A friend and I once proposed to don kendo bogu and see what really works and the instructors were horrified, apparently at the thought we might be injured but also there might be a serious examination of whether there is any practical use of it.

    BTW Nakayama Hakudô shihan went on to become an advanced jô instructor.

    noboru

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    keijójutsu (police art of stick)

    Post by noboru on Wed Apr 27, 2016 4:51 pm

    NBK wrote:
    BTW Nakayama Hakudô shihan went on to become an advanced jô instructor.  

    Yes, Nakayama Hakudo was Butokukai hanshi in jodo too (he was hanshi in kendo and in iaido). He created own jojutsu style known as Nakayama-no-jo (nice article from Jeffrey Karinja  http://kenshi247.net/blog/2011/02/14/a-lineage-all-but-forgotten-the-yushinkan-nakayama-hakudo/ ).
    Remembered Shimizu Takaji sensei and his pupils taugh basic jodo the policemen around Tokio - 7 members group known as tokubetsu keibitai (sometimes kidótai) or special police unit. This group was specialy trained in jo using. His modern using of jo for police using had name keijójutsu (police art of stick).
    Shimizu had the impact for next police weapon teachings created after WW2 - keibó sóhó (methods of using police baton), next teleskopic baton tokushu keibó (special baton), or too tobi dashi jutte (jumping baton), police hojojutsu (police art of bind)
    These informations are created from my informations from my friend Mr. Patrik Orth - he is head of czech group of Shinto Muso ryu (pupil of Pascal Krieger) and he is interesting about jojutsu history.  

    Later (first introduced in year 1968) Shimizu sensei created basic style of jodo, now known as Zen Ken Renmei Seitei Jōdō. This system is practiced around the world under Zen Nihon Kendo Renmei and related organizations. Some judoka (who trained judo in Japan between years 1960-1980) learned from Shimizu jodo and next arts related to original Shinto Muso ryu. For example Donn Draeger from USA, Pascal Krieger from Switzerland.

    Japanese policemen in Osaka (near embassy of Korea)

    noboru

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    Re: Jigoró Kanó and Nakayama Hakudó

    Post by noboru on Wed Apr 27, 2016 5:06 pm

    NBK wrote:Jôdô seems to me to be a terrible waste - years ago they emasculated what was apparently once a hugely practical and powerful martial art. It is now mostly pointless posturing and endless polishing of nothing. A friend and I once proposed to don kendo bogu and see what really works and the instructors were horrified, apparently at the thought we might be injured but also there might be a serious examination of whether there is any practical use of it.

    I dont know. It could be as you wrote. I saw some embu of people from Shinto Muso ryu (under FEI - people around Pascal Krieger) and their enbus look very practical and they were very skilled in jo using.

    Shinto Muso ryu - ran-ai odachi


    Pascal Krieger - part about Shinto Muso ryu - some from kata practice - time 7:00
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AV2IVwitAyI

    BillC

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    Re: Jigoró Kanó and Nakayama Hakudó

    Post by BillC on Thu Apr 28, 2016 2:55 am

    What's this? A good old fashioned Judo Forum controversy. Flame on ... for old times sake. Wink


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