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    Discussion of the state of judo in Japan

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    NBK

    Posts : 1060
    Join date : 2013-01-10
    Location : Tokyo, Japan

    Discussion of the state of judo in Japan

    Post by NBK on Thu Mar 14, 2013 11:37 am

    Last weekend I attended the 25th International Seminar of Budo Culture. The outline of it can be found here:

    [center]Intl Seminar of Budo Culture - English

    It was very well done - lots of top ranking instructors, good food, great camaraderie, etc.

    I spent time with a senior judoka, the ranking one, talking about the state of judo in Japan. It turns out that he wrote the segment on judo and its internationalization (the primary topic of the seminar), but did not put his name on it so I leave it off herein, too.

    I thought his words on the outline were interesting; while muted compared to our discussion, I think you can get the general feeling by reading between the lines.

    ****quote****
    General Discussion – Judo
    The History of Judo’s Internationalization
    …. Deleted….

    The Current Situation

    The London Olympics were held in August 2012. In judo, the combined medal tally of the men and women amounted to 1 gold, 3 silver, and 3 bronze, making 7 altogether. The women fought hard to obtain one gold medal, but for the first time in Olympic history, the Japanese men failed to win a single top placing. This fact is testament of the wide scale advancement of judo’s internationalization. Even when considering the judo population in each country, France comes in at number one with a registered membership of 600,000. Compared to this, Japan’s current membership comes in at less than one-third with 170,000 members.

    One of the main differences between Japan and France is the French federation encouraged practitioners to adhere to judo etiquette not only in the dojo, but also to apply it to their everyday lives. The French Yudanshakai formulated the “Code Moral” comprised of the 8 virtues of “Courtesy, courage, friendship, self-control, honesty, humility, honour, respect.” This is very much in line with the ideals espoused by Kano Jigoro. In Japan, on the other hand, national championships are held from elementary school, and completion has been at the forefront of its propagation. As a result, “commercialism”, and “victory at all costs” has distorted its integrity. It is feared to say that France has taken the helm to cover the gap between Kano ideals and judo as it is now.

    However, from April 2012, budo has been introduced into junior high schools as a compulsory subject to encourage Japan’s youth to “Respect traditional value …. and contribute to society’s peace and development.” (Around 64% of schools have chosen to teach judo.) The All Japan Judo Federation decided to fully implement an official instructor’s certification system from 2013 to help nurture competent teachers around the country. The aim is to cultivate instructors who (have) a balanced view of judo from the perspectives of Kano Jigoro’s educational ideals, competitive aspects, and history.

    At the first Summer Youth Olympics held in Singapore in 2010, IOC President Jacques Rogge said that (the) objective was to provide youth with opportunities to come together through sport and maintain a healthy lifestyle, contribute to society, interact with people of various different nationalities, and develop a professional outlook. Also it was expected that participants would learn about the importance of Olympism and the spirit of fair play. It is thought that commitment to these fundamental principles are in regression.
    ****unquote***
    pg 31, Program, The 25th International Seminar of Budo Culture, March 8-11, 2013.

    There was also an interesting lecture (for the few judoka interested; perhaps not so to the others) on the development of judo in France by Murakami Kiyoshi, Secretary General, All Japan Judo Federation, entitled "The Internationalization of Judo "Japanese Budo" and "French Judo".

    wdax

    Posts : 173
    Join date : 2013-01-22

    Re: Discussion of the state of judo in Japan

    Post by wdax on Thu Mar 14, 2013 7:16 pm

    This is very interesting. My experience is, that those, who feel the need to implement something (here: virtues or "moral education" in judo), are not always the best examples for having already reached the goals. There are other countries in Europe coming into my mind, when thinking about these things.

    But anyway, stating in public, that western countries are closer to the ideals of judo then Japan is really a major step even if the name is not under the paper.

      Current date/time is Sun Dec 11, 2016 1:15 pm