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    My fights from the weekend

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    JudoMojo

    Posts : 46
    Join date : 2012-12-29
    Location : UK

    My fights from the weekend

    Post by JudoMojo on Tue Mar 19, 2013 12:43 am

    Hi all, Just wanted to share my fights from the weekend and hopefully pick up some feedback. I am fighting with the white belt for both of the fights.








    There might be some more coming but I don't have access to those videos yet.

    Thanks,
    Pete
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    Cichorei Kano

    Posts : 1948
    Join date : 2013-01-16
    Age : 857
    Location : the Holy See

    Re: My fights from the weekend

    Post by Cichorei Kano on Tue Mar 19, 2013 1:14 am

    Both fights are somewhat 'erratic' meaning that there isn't a clear strategy and that what you do is not dictated by action/reaction. Basically, you do your stuff and your opponent does his stuff with there being little connection between the two in terms of what occurs.

    In your first fight you dominate, which is your opponent's biggest mistake in terms of "letting you". He is forced into defense by you. That is something his coach needs to talk to him about. When you are forced into defense and you remain in that position, it usually means two things: either you will finally get thrown, or you will get penalized. If an opponent feels that the other is continuously puts in defense, then it becomes easier to anticipate what he is going to do.

    I would discourage you from still throwing your opponent after matte. By doing so you give away that you may be relatively strong in a certain technique and may fail to be effective with it next time. However, there are those who feel that still throwing someone after matte gives you a psychological advantage. Hard to say as we are then in the field of speculation. The waza-ari for your opponent is exaggerated, but a sign of the times, I guess. Because you won, probably the waza-ari thing became important; it probably wouldn't if you would not have scored ippon. For that reason, I think it still matters. You can't change those scores or the referees' views, so one has to avoid those things. That being said, it was one of the few occurrences where judo-wise action/reaction was present, so really your opponent did well there. In conclusion, well done because you won, but you have more work to do in fighting more efficiently, not wasting energy, and going for your opponent's weaknesses rather than an all out all over the place kind of approach.

    One of your strong points is that there is some good promise with regard to a number of throws. Well done, continue practice, there certainly is technical skill in development.

    The second fight is characterized by similar erratic movement, but with the difference that you are not establishing dominance and your opponent is not forced into defense. Your opponent is not afraid of you. It's a typical learning fight, the kind of thing and experience you have to go through to become better. Overall, you lack establishing control, that is to say, when there is 'control' it is mainly surprise or force, but your instructor needs to discuss with you how to establish proper control with the right arm. It's a typical fight where due to a lack in one area most of the arsenal of techniques becomes deactivated or ineffective. There is no sense in further discussing the osae-komi as we all know that getting out of an osae-komi during shiai is often very hard if not near impossible.

    Please continue working on the technical and strategic side of things in your club.


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    JudoMojo

    Posts : 46
    Join date : 2012-12-29
    Location : UK

    Re: My fights from the weekend

    Post by JudoMojo on Tue Mar 19, 2013 2:51 am

    Thank you for the detailed analysis CK.

    Both fights are somewhat 'erratic' meaning that there isn't a clear strategy and that what you do is not dictated by action/reaction. Basically, you do your stuff and your opponent does his stuff with there being little connection between the two in terms of what occurs.
    I think I can definitely agree with this, the problem is I simply don't have a go to strategy, I am still working out what works for me I guess. If you watched the video of me fighting from late 2012 I looked different and did different techniques. High grip uchi mata is coming through, I managed a nice ippon with it in another contest (no video sadly), funnily enough I barely use it in randori or practice, although going to try focus on it more now.



    In your first fight you dominate, which is your opponent's biggest mistake in terms of "letting you". He is forced into defense by you. That is something his coach needs to talk to him about. When you are forced into defense and you remain in that position, it usually means two things: either you will finally get thrown, or you will get penalized. If an opponent feels that the other is continuously puts in defense, then it becomes easier to anticipate what he is going to do.

    I would discourage you from still throwing your opponent after matte. By doing so you give away that you may be relatively strong in a certain technique and may fail to be effective with it next time. However, there are those who feel that still throwing someone after matte gives you a psychological advantage. Hard to say as we are then in the field of speculation. The waza-ari for your opponent is exaggerated, but a sign of the times, I guess. Because you won, probably the waza-ari thing became important; it probably wouldn't if you would not have scored ippon. For that reason, I think it still matters. You can't change those scores or the referees' views, so one has to avoid those things. That being said, it was one of the few occurrences where judo-wise action/reaction was present, so really your opponent did well there. In conclusion, well done because you won, but you have more work to do in fighting more efficiently, not wasting energy, and going for your opponent's weaknesses rather than an all out all over the place kind of approach.

    With regards to the throw after matte, It was actually completely accidental. I must have had 'tunnel hearing' or something, because I thought I had won by ippon until I saw the corner judge with his hand showing matte (didn't notice stepping out of bounds either). Don't know why I was smiling, probably because I had actually landed a nice throw for once and it ironically got discounted. I think it did work against me as he seemed very wary of uchimata attacks for the rest of the contest and I didn't really feel confident in attacking successfully with it again (probably a mistake on my part).

    When you talk of the waza-ari for the opponent, I re-watched the video but couldn't see it, was it when I took him back into osaekomi? I thought that one was mine!



    One of your strong points is that there is some good promise with regard to a number of throws. Well done, continue practice, there certainly is technical skill in development.

    Very kind of you to say, I thought the uchimata was nice but the other throws were a little disappointing for me. Oh well, getting better !



    The second fight is characterized by similar erratic movement, but with the difference that you are not establishing dominance and your opponent is not forced into defense. Your opponent is not afraid of you. It's a typical learning fight, the kind of thing and experience you have to go through to become better. Overall, you lack establishing control, that is to say, when there is 'control' it is mainly surprise or force, but your instructor needs to discuss with you how to establish proper control with the right arm. It's a typical fight where due to a lack in one area most of the arsenal of techniques becomes deactivated or ineffective. There is no sense in further discussing the osae-komi as we all know that getting out of an osae-komi during shiai is often very hard if not near impossible.

    Yes, the second fight was a tough one, I felt I couldn't really move him with my attacks, and his were all enough to send me at least onto my front. I will work with my coach on controlling the opponent.

    Please continue working on the technical and strategic side of things in your club.

    Thank you, I will do!
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    nomoremondays

    Posts : 122
    Join date : 2013-01-03
    Location : Looking for Stars (sort of)

    Re: My fights from the weekend

    Post by nomoremondays on Tue Mar 19, 2013 5:26 am

    i liked your fights thumbup1 folks better than i can comment on technical points. may i ask what grade you are?
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    JudoMojo

    Posts : 46
    Join date : 2012-12-29
    Location : UK

    Re: My fights from the weekend

    Post by JudoMojo on Tue Mar 19, 2013 6:08 am

    nomoremondays wrote:i liked your fights thumbup1 folks better than i can comment on technical points. may i ask what grade you are?

    Thanks!

    I am a (newish) 1st kyu.

    GregW

    Posts : 103
    Join date : 2013-01-22
    Location : Norman, Oklahoma

    Re: My fights from the weekend

    Post by GregW on Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:40 am

    Hi,

    You're very brave to post your shiai videos. I agree with the last poster on the second clip. It appeared that you were fairly tired at that point. Your opponent appeared to have a lot of upper body strength and kept you busy grip fighting. Really strong guys will do that to wear you out. When I run into that, my strategy is to begin moving laterally and changing directions in unexpected ways, trying to cover lots of mat area. While the other guy is busy trying to establish a grip, I want to create momentum that can be exploited for ashi waza. I find I can "survive" longer with a strong opponent if I keep moving around a lot. It seems to open up more opportunities to throw rather than stay in a tight circle and defensively gripfight for a couple of minutes.
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    JudoMojo

    Posts : 46
    Join date : 2012-12-29
    Location : UK

    Re: My fights from the weekend

    Post by JudoMojo on Sat Mar 23, 2013 1:07 am

    GregW wrote:Hi,

    You're very brave to post your shiai videos. I agree with the last poster on the second clip. It appeared that you were fairly tired at that point. Your opponent appeared to have a lot of upper body strength and kept you busy grip fighting. Really strong guys will do that to wear you out. When I run into that, my strategy is to begin moving laterally and changing directions in unexpected ways, trying to cover lots of mat area. While the other guy is busy trying to establish a grip, I want to create momentum that can be exploited for ashi waza. I find I can "survive" longer with a strong opponent if I keep moving around a lot. It seems to open up more opportunities to throw rather than stay in a tight circle and defensively gripfight for a couple of minutes.

    Thanks for the feedback.

    Yeah I couldn't really get hold of the second guy properly, he had better gripping than me. My sort of full out attack style of judo tends not to work against people who can stall me out. Need to work on moving around more rather than trying to power through.

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